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descriptionhow to know Emptyhow to know

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the hash tables size i should use for different free engines on fritz 15 gui?
Pls explain step by step, for example, stockfish, brainfish, etc,
I know that it depends upon the computer each one has. But i dont know how to do it.
Thx a lot!!!

descriptionhow to know EmptyRe: how to know

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Depends on how many cores you want to use, plus the amount of RAM that you have.

descriptionhow to know Emptybut

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how to ponder in a dos windows?
2 cores and 8 gb ram


@Graham Banks wrote:
Depends on how many cores you want to use, plus the amount of RAM that you have.

descriptionhow to know Emptywhat should i do to know if i have to setup

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128 mb ram. or 256 or 512 or 1024 or so on...??????

@Powerchess wrote:
how to ponder in a dos windows?
2 cores and 8 gb ram


@Graham Banks wrote:
Depends on how many cores you want to use, plus the amount of RAM that you have.

descriptionhow to know Emptymaybe i am not being understood

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I want to benchmark????!!!!

@Powerchess wrote:
128 mb ram. or 256 or 512 or 1024 or so on...??????

@Powerchess wrote:
how to ponder in a dos windows?
2 cores and 8 gb ram


@Graham Banks wrote:
Depends on how many cores you want to use, plus the amount of RAM that you have.


descriptionhow to know EmptyRe: how to know

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@Powerchess wrote:
how to ponder in a dos windows?
2 cores and 8 gb ram


If you're using ponder=on, I suggest using 2gb hash per engine, although if you're using fast time controls, it would be best to use less.

descriptionhow to know EmptyGraham ,the question is

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how to know if i am using ponder=on, and how to change it and another parameters .....
i remember that previous to fritz 15, it wa s a function of benchmarking, where u set the engine, and could change the mb hash sizes and it gave u a number of speed or something like that.... Isnt that available anymore???
Thx Graham


quote="Graham Banks"]
@Powerchess wrote:
how to ponder in a dos windows?
2 cores and 8 gb ram


If you're using ponder=on, I suggest using 2gb hash per engine, although if you're using fast time controls, it would be best to use less.[/quote]

descriptionhow to know EmptyThis is what i were looking for....

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Benchmark

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Engine – Chess Benchmark



Benchmark



The speed of the hardware that the engine is running on, has great influence on its playing strength. Obviously, a 3 GHz Pentium is going to give you a much better performance than one running at 1.7 GHz. But the optimum configuration of the hardware also plays an important role. For instance, the amount of first and second level cache, the speed of access to memory, and other such factors, can lead to considerable variance. Two computers with exactly the same processor may produce quite different results.



A built-in chess benchmark helps you measure the chess specific performance of your hardware. In order to make the results reproducible it is always conducted with a standard chess engine.



The results of the chess benchmark test depend to a great extent on the size of the hash tables. It also varies according to the number of applications you have running in the background. You should use the test to check the effectiveness of your current configuration.



Typical chess benchmark values for a 2.6 GHz Pentium with 128 MB hash tables is 1.4 (i.e. it is 1.4 times faster than a P3 running at 1 GHz. You should get a kilonodes per second value of abround 600. The Centrino and Athlons will give you much better values, since they are better suited to the kind of (integer) calculations used by chess engines.



The nodes-per-second value of the chess benchmark gives you the number of positions the engine is generating and evaluating per second. This value (in “kilo nodes”) is independent of hash tables, and depends almost solely on processor speed. Some engines will give you up to two million nodes per second on modern hardware. But remember that the lower node counts of some engines does not necessarily mean that they are weaker. Usually they are simply processing more chess knowledge.



Fritz Chess Benchmark.exe

On the program DVD there is a utility called Fritz Chess Benchmark.exe. This is what is running during a chess benchmark as described above. The utility can also be started independently, which means you can copy it onto a memory stick and run it on different computers when you are purchasing a new one. This will help you make sure you select a machine that gives you good values for chess calculations.

descriptionhow to know EmptyRe: how to know

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