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World Chess Championship 2012

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http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/chessnews/events/world-chess-championship-2012

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The FIDE World Chess Championship Match is on!
http://moscow2012.fide.com/en/home/12-news-en/208-first-game

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match 2012"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.11"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "*"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[PlyCount "43"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 c5 8.
Bb5+ Nc6 9. d5 Qa5 10. Rb1 a6 11. Bxc6+ bxc6 12. O-O Qxa2 13. Rb2 Qa5 14. d6
Ra7 15. Bg5 exd6 16. Qxd6 Rd7 17. Qxc6 Qc7 18. Qxc7 Rxc7 19. Bf4 Rb7 20. Rc2
O-O 21. Bd6 Re8 22. Nd2 *

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match 2012"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.11"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "*"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[PlyCount "45"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 c5 8.
Bb5+ Nc6 9. d5 Qa5 10. Rb1 a6 11. Bxc6+ bxc6 12. O-O Qxa2 13. Rb2 Qa5 14. d6
Ra7 15. Bg5 exd6 16. Qxd6 Rd7 17. Qxc6 Qc7 18. Qxc7 Rxc7 19. Bf4 Rb7 20. Rc2
O-O 21. Bd6 Re8 22. Nd2 f5 23. f3 *

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match 2012"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.11"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[PlyCount "48"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 c5 8.
Bb5+ Nc6 9. d5 Qa5 10. Rb1 a6 11. Bxc6+ bxc6 12. O-O Qxa2 13. Rb2 Qa5 14. d6
Ra7 15. Bg5 exd6 16. Qxd6 Rd7 17. Qxc6 Qc7 18. Qxc7 Rxc7 19. Bf4 Rb7 20. Rc2
O-O 21. Bd6 Re8 22. Nd2 f5 23. f3 fxe4 24. Nxe4 Bf5 1/2-1/2

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ANAND-GELFAND FIDE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP MATCH 2012 Game 1




ANAND-GELFAND FIDE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2012 Game 1 Pt.2




ANAND-GELFAND FIDE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2012 Game 1 Pt.3

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2nd game tie exclaim

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[Event "Wch Match 2012"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.05.12"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D45"]
[WhiteElo "2727"]
[BlackElo "2791"]
[Annotator "Romain Edouard"]
[PlyCount "49"]
[SourceDate "2012.05.12"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5. Nf3 a6 $5 {The first surprise. Anand
deviates from the more usual 5...Nbd7.} 6. b3 {The main move nowadays.} (6. Qc2
{is also very popular, while Gelfand already played 6.Bd3 and 6.c5!? in the
past.}) 6... Bb4 $5 {Black considers White's bishop will be misplaced on d2,
since it would be more logical to put it on b2 later.} (6... c5 {is also
possible: a typical reaction against systems with b3.}) 7. Bd2 Nbd7 8. Bd3 O-O
9. O-O Bd6 10. Rc1 $5 {A rare move, which is probably the second surprise of
the game.} (10. Qc2 {is the most popular move.}) (10. e4 dxc4 11. bxc4 e5 {is
supposed to be fine for Black.}) (10. Re1 $5 {is kind of a last-fashion move,
which both players surely analyzed quite deeply.}) 10... e5 {The most logical
reaction.} (10... Re8 {and 10...h6 have already been played by several strong
players.}) 11. cxd5 cxd5 12. e4 $5 {A recent idea, but already played twice by
GM Riazantsev.} (12. dxe5 Nxe5 13. Nxe5 Bxe5 14. Ne2 {with the idea of Bc3
used to be considered as very slightly better for White, but it seems after}
Ne4 $1 {Black is more or less able to solve all problems:} 15. Bxe4 dxe4 16.
Bc3 Bg4 $1 17. Bxe5 Qxd1 18. Rfxd1 Bxe2 19. Rd7 Rac8 20. Rdc7 {1/2-1/2 (20)
Najer,E (2638)-Jakovenko,D (2602) Olginka RUS 2011}) 12... dxe4 13. Nxe4 Nxe4
14. Bxe4 Nf6 $5 $146 {And a third surprise! Until today's game, Black had
never been able to solve all problems in that line.} (14... exd4 15. Rc4 $1 Nc5
(15... Nf6 16. Bb1 $5 Bg4 {(probably not the most accurate move)} 17. Bg5 h6
18. Bh4 Bxf3 19. Qxf3 g5 20. Bg3 $14 {1/2-1/2 (46) Riazantsev,A (2688)
-Matlakov,M (2630) St Petersburg RUS 2011}) 16. Bg5 f6 (16... Qe8 $5 {might be
a better move.}) 17. Bxh7+ $1 $146 (17. Bd5+ Kh8 {with the idea of ...Bxh2+
was fine for Black in Riazantsev,A (2710)-Antoniewski,R (2559) Warszawa POL
2011 (65) 1/2-1/2}) 17... Kxh7 18. Rxd4 fxg5 19. Rxd6 Qe7 20. Re1 Ne6 21. Re5
$1 {and White is better according to my friend Houdini.}) 15. dxe5 (15. Bg5
exd4 16. Rc4 (16. Qxd4 $6 Bxh2+ {and White loses a pawn.}) 16... h6 $1 {
transposes into a game (which initially came 14...exd4 15.Bg5 Nf6 16.Rc4):} 17.
Rxd4 (17. Bh4 g5 18. Rxd4 Nxe4 19. Rxe4 Qb6 {is simply OK for Black.}) 17...
hxg5 18. Rxd6 Qe7 19. Bb1 Bg4 20. Re1 Bxf3 21. Rxe7 Bxd1 22. Rxd1 Rfd8 $11 {1/
2-1/2 (37) Goganov,A (2480)-Rublevsky,S (2682) Taganrog RUS 2011}) 15... Nxe4
16. exd6 Qxd6 17. Be3 {White has a symbolic advtantage but the position is a
draw.} Bf5 18. Qxd6 Nxd6 19. Nd4 (19. Rfd1 {looks like a better option at
first sight, but after} Rfd8 $1 20. Bb6 Rdc8 $1 {Black holds easily.}) 19...
Rfe8 20. Nxf5 Nxf5 21. Bc5 h5 $1 22. Rfd1 Rac8 23. Kf1 f6 24. Bb4 Kh7 25. Rc5 {
Not such a fascinating game, but still quite an interesting one from
theoretical point of view.} 1/2-1/2

http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=8151

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ANAND-GELFAND FIDE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2012 GAME 2 PT.1

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ANAND-GELFAND FIDE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2012 GAME 2 PT.2

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POST CONFERENCE GAME 2 FIDE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2012

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.14"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D70"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[PlyCount "74"]
[EventDate "2012.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]
[TimeControl "40/7200+30:20/3600+30:900+30"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. f3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nb6 6. Nc3 Bg7 7. Be3 O-O 8. Qd2
e5 9. d5 c6 10. h4 cxd5 11. exd5 N8d7 12. h5 Nf6 13. hxg6 fxg6 14. O-O-O Bd7
15. Kb1 Rc8 16. Ka1 e4 17. Bd4 Na4 18. Nge2 Qa5 19. Nxe4 Qxd2 20. Nxf6+ Rxf6
21. Rxd2 Rf5 22. Bxg7 Kxg7 23. d6 Rfc5 24. Rd1 a5 25. Rh4 Rc2 26. b3 Nb2 27.
Rb1 Nd3 28. Nd4 Rd2 29. Bxd3 Rxd3 30. Re1 Rd2 31. Kb1 Bf5+ 32. Nxf5+ gxf5 33.
Re7+ Kg6 34. Rc7 Re8 35. Rh1 Ree2 36. d7 Rb2+ 37. Kc1 Rxa2 1/2-1/2

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POST CONFERENCE GAME 3 FIDE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2012

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Andrew Martin comments on game three

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Daniel King comments on game three

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.15"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D45"]
[WhiteElo "2727"]
[BlackElo "2791"]
[Annotator "Edouard,Romain"]
[PlyCount "68"]
[EventDate "2012.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5. Nf3 a6 6. b3 {Exactly the same system
as in round two.} Bb4 7. Bd2 Nbd7 8. Bd3 O-O 9. O-O Bd6 10. Qc2 {This time,
Gelfand goes for the main move, deviating from the second game, where 10.Rc1
was played.} e5 $5 (10... h6 {is the main move according to theory, but 10...
e5 worked very well for Black in all the games played till now.}) 11. cxd5 cxd5
12. e4 {Of course taking on e5 would no longer make any sense with the rook on
a1 and the queen on c2.} exd4 13. Nxd5 Nxd5 14. exd5 Nf6 {[%eval 28,0]} 15. h3
$5 {[%eval 24,0] A very logical move played only once. Against almost all
other moves, Black would go 15...Bg4 and simply equalize.} (15. Qc4 Bg4 16.
Qxd4 Bxf3 17. gxf3 Nxd5 $11 {1/2-1/2 (36) Avrukh,B (2632)-Wang,H (2684)
Dagomys RUS 2008}) (15. Rfe1 Bg4 16. Nxd4 Rc8 17. Qb2 Rc5 $11 {1/2-1/2 (70)
Aleksandrov,A (2636)-Kharlov,A (2511) RUS 2009}) (15. Nxd4 Be5 $11) 15... Bd7 {
[%eval 32,0] Anand keeps playing very fast.} 16. Rad1 {[%eval 23,0]} ({There
was no hurry to play ...h6, since after} 16. Bg5 h6 17. Bh4 Rc8 18. Qd2 Rc5 $1
{it seems Black equalizes.}) 16... Re8 {[%eval 24,0]} 17. Nxd4 {[%eval 38,0]}
Rc8 {[%eval 56,0]} 18. Qb1 {[%eval 52,0]} h6 {[%eval 72,0] We reached the
typical setup in that kind of structures, where White is up a pawn that he
cannot really hold. The only question is always: can White force Black to
capture the pawn back in poor conditions?} 19. Nf5 {[%eval 40,0] Of course
after taking the bishop pair, White has a very (very) slight advantage, but it
doesn't seem enough at all. It seems to me that after 19.Nf3 White would have
decent chances to get some advantage, though Anand had been playing very fast
until 18...h6, which should mean he has some precise idea against 19.Nf3.} (19.
Nf3 $5 Nxd5 ({Of course it would be possible to delay ...Nxd5, but after a
move like} 19... Qc7 {White could go} 20. Bc1 {and slowly reorganize his
pieces, and it looks clear to me that Black should have some problems, though
maybe solvable.}) 20. Be4 $1 (20. Bh7+ Kh8 21. Bxh6 $2 {doesn't work because of
} Nc3 $17) 20... Bc6 21. Nd4 {and White can take the bishop pair, and I don't
see how Black can exactly equalize, e.g.} Qb6 (21... Nc3 $2 22. Bh7+ (22. Nxc6
Nxb1 23. Nxd8 Nxd2 24. Rxd2 Rcxd8 $11) 22... Kh8 23. Bxc3 {and according to
the engine Black is still in the game with} Bxg2 $1 {but after} 24. Nf5 $8 Bxh3
(24... Be4 25. Qc1 $8 Rxc3 26. Qxc3 Qg5+ 27. Ng3 $16) 25. Bxg7+ Kxh7 26. Nxd6+
Kxg7 27. Nxe8+ Qxe8 28. Rfe1 {White is clearly better.}) 22. Nxc6 bxc6 23. Bh7+
Kh8 24. Bd3 $14 {Most probably Anand had some idea which I just miss! I'm also
not sure how easy is the calculation of 21...Nxc3 over the board.}) 19... Bxf5
{[%eval 32,0]} 20. Bxf5 {[%eval 42,0]} Rc5 {[%eval 25,0]} 21. Rfe1 {[%eval 48,
0]} (21. Rc1 $5 {is an interesting option, but whatever Black plays he is very
close to equality. At least much closer than in the 19.Nf3 line is Black
doesn't have a clear way to exchange some pieces.}) 21... Rxd5 {[%eval 22,0]}
22. Bc3 {[%eval 16,0]} Rxe1+ {[%eval 28,0]} 23. Rxe1 {[%eval 30,0]} Bc5 {
[%eval 24,0]} 24. Qc2 {[%eval 8,0]} Bd4 $1 {[%eval -4,0] Now the position is
absolutely equal.} 25. Bxd4 {[%eval 0,0]} Rxd4 {[%eval 8,0]} 26. Qc8 {[%eval 4,
0]} g6 {[%eval 0,0]} 27. Bg4 {[%eval 0,0]} h5 {[%eval 8,0]} (27... Nxg4 $4 28.
Re8+ $18) 28. Qxd8+ {[%eval 11,0]} Rxd8 {[%eval 4,0]} 29. Bf3 {[%eval 20,0]} b6
{[%eval 0,0]} 30. Rc1 {[%eval 0,0]} Rd6 {[%eval 0,0]} 31. Kf1 {[%eval 24,0]} a5
{[%eval 9,0]} 32. Ke2 {[%eval 12,0]} Nd5 $5 {[%eval 8,0] The most dynamic.} (
32... Kf8 {is also equal.}) 33. g3 {[%eval 8,0]} (33. Bxd5 Rxd5 34. Rc6 Re5+
35. Kd3 b5 $5 $11 {White's king can never advance so easily due to some
problems with the 2nd file!}) 33... Ne7 34. Be4 Kg7 {Though equal score, the
impression after four games is that Anand is drawing with Black much more
easily than Gelfand is. This means Gelfand is a little bit under pressure, and
that his team will have to find more resources with White. But Gelfand's play
is anyway very dynamic, and it is clear that the Israeli will be ready to
punish any mistake from his opponent. Let's not forget that Gelfand had more
problems with Black, but also played riskier openings: and the result 0-1 also
exists in chess!} 1/2-1/2

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World Championship G4 reflections – it's the computers!
http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=8162

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World Chess Championship 2012 Anand - Gelfand Rest Day 2 Reflection by GM Daniel King

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.17"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B33"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[Annotator "Romain Edouard"]
[PlyCount "53"]
[EventDate "2012.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

1. e4 {Does it mean the Grunfeld cannot be refuted?} c5 {Does it mean Petroff
can be refuted? Well, at least, it's good to see something different going on.}
2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 {Gelfand had already played this
system... almost ten years ago!} 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bg5 a6 8. Na3 b5 9. Nd5 Be7 10.
Bxf6 Bxf6 11. c4 {Definitely not the most fascinating line, though most
popular recently.} b4 12. Nc2 O-O 13. g3 ({It is well know that} 13. Ncxb4 Nxb4
14. Nxb4 Qb6 {is good for Black.}) 13... a5 14. Bg2 Bg5 15. O-O Be6 16. Qd3 {
[%eval 8,0]} Bxd5 $5 {[%eval 19,0] A novetly. Black is just trying to set a
draw immediatly.} (16... Qb8 {used to be played, while after} 17. f4 {Black
can even keep the tension playing} Bd8 $5 {as it came in the game
Borisek-Moiseenko, Porto Carras 2011.}) 17. cxd5 {[%eval 18,0] A bit symmetric,
but necessary. In general White always has a small advantage in that kind of
positions, due to some space avantage. The main problem is that the bishop on
h6 prevents White from using the c-file...} Nb8 {[%eval 51,0]} 18. a3 $146 {
[%eval 54,0]} Na6 $5 {[%eval 71,0]} ({My engine prefers} 18... bxa3 19. Nxa3
Nd7 {which is probably also not so much for White.}) 19. axb4 {[%eval 69,0]
Also necessary. White has nothing better to do than trying this slightly
better sort of endgame.} Nxb4 {[%eval 70,0]} 20. Nxb4 {[%eval 77,0]} axb4 {
[%eval 44,0]} 21. h4 {[%eval 45,0]} Bh6 {[%eval 45,0]} 22. Bh3 $6 {[%eval 16,0]
Too slow. But the reason White cannot win - in general - this kind of
positions is that Black may sometimes just give up the b-pawn and still make a
draw. All Black has to avoid is to lose the d6-pawn (unless the b-pawn is
queening!). Normally, in that kind of positions, a bishop on d5 would be very
welcome, in order to be able to put pressure out of the f7-pawn. But White has
a irremovable pawn on d5, while Black may be able to put a bishop on d4 (or c5)
one day, which would be enough to make a draw even a pawn down in most of the
cases.} ({White should probably try} 22. Qc4 Qb6 ({Even} 22... b3 $5 23. Qxb3
Bd2 {might be enough for a draw: not sure White can prevent Black from playing
...Qb6 and putting a bishop on c5. White would have an extra pawn, but no way
at all to create problems. It is well known that in "opposite colored bishops
endgames, the material is not preponderant.}) 23. Qc6 Rab8 24. Rfd1 $5 {[%cal
Ga1a6]} (24. Ra6 Qd4 $132) 24... Rfc8 25. Qxb6 Rxb6 26. Bh3 Rcb8 27. b3 {and
White has a small pressure, though I'm not sure winning chances are so real.})
22... Qb6 {[%eval 28,0]} 23. Bd7 {[%eval 33,0]} b3 $1 {[%eval 14,0]} 24. Bc6 {
[%eval 17,0]} Ra2 {[%eval 19,0]} 25. Rxa2 {[%eval 16,0]} bxa2 {[%eval 22,0]}
26. Qa3 (26. b3 {is an option but one forced draw would be} Rb8 27. Ba4 Rc8 28.
Ra1 Rc1+ 29. Rxc1 Bxc1 30. Qc2 g5 $1 31. Qxa2 gxh4 32. gxh4 Qd8 $11) 26... Rb8
27. Qxa2 {A very good opening choice by Gelfand. After such a game, my opinion
is that there might be no decisive result at all if one of the players doesn't
go out of the main theory with White.} 1/2-1/2

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Analysis of game five by GM Daniel King on Playchess

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ANAND-GELFAND FIDE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2012 GAME 5 PT1





ANAND-GELFAND FIDE WORLD CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP 2012 GAME 5 PT2

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.18"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D45"]
[WhiteElo "2727"]
[BlackElo "2791"]
[Annotator "Robot 9"]
[PlyCount "58"]
[EventDate "2012.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]
[TimeControl "40/7200+30:20/3600+30:900+30"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5. Nf3 a6 6. Qc2 c5 7. cxd5 exd5 8. Be2
Be6 9. O-O Nc6 10. Rd1 cxd4 11. Nxd4 Nxd4 12. Rxd4 Bc5 13. Rd1 Qe7 14. Bf3 O-O
15. Nxd5 Bxd5 16. Bxd5 Nxd5 17. Rxd5 Rac8 18. Bd2 Bxe3 19. Bc3 Bb6 20. Qf5 Qe6
21. Qf3 f6 22. h4 Qc6 23. h5 Rfd8 24. Rxd8+ Rxd8 25. Qxc6 bxc6 26. Re1 Kf7 27.
g4 Bd4 28. Rc1 Bxc3 29. Rxc3 Rd4 1/2-1/2

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Andrew Martin comments on game six

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6th game with Garry Kasparov press conference

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.05.20"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D45"]
[WhiteElo "2727"]
[BlackElo "2791"]
[Annotator "Gilberto Milos"]
[PlyCount "75"]
[EventDate "2010.04.29"]

{Gelfand repeats white in game seven since this is the start of the second
half of the match and they invert colours.} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e3
e6 5. Nf3 a6 6. c5 {Gelfand tries a different idea than Qc2 which led to
nothing in game six.} Nbd7 7. Qc2 {[%eval 23,0]} b6 {[%eval 31,0] Another idea
for Black is to play for ...e5 which could be achieved after ...Qe7 and g6.} 8.
cxb6 {[%eval 12,0]} Nxb6 {[%eval 44,0]} 9. Bd2 {[%eval 24,0]} c5 {[%eval 8,0]}
10. Rc1 {[%eval 18,0]} cxd4 {[%eval 12,0] This releases the central pressure
and opens the white bishop on d2. Alternatives were;} (10... c4 11. b3) (10...
Nfd7) 11. exd4 {[%eval 30,0]} Bd6 {[%eval 9,0]} 12. Bg5 {[%eval 11,0] Black's
pawn structure is better but the bishop on c8 is worse than White's bishop and
this makes Gelfand's play easier.} ({If the challenger had played} 12. Bd3 {
then Black might reply with} h6 $5 {and White would not be able to activate
his bishop on d2 so soon.}) 12... O-O {[%eval 2,0]} 13. Bd3 {[%eval 6,0]} h6 {
[%eval 2,0]} 14. Bh4 {[%eval 3,0]} Bb7 {[%eval 20,0] If Black plays the idea ..
.a5-Ba6, to exchange his bad bishop, then the b5 square would be weakened.} 15.
O-O {[%eval 2,0][%cal Rc2e2,Rf3e5,Rf2f4] White's plan is Qe2-Ne5-f4.} Qb8 {
[%eval 52,0][%csl Re5][%cal Rf6d7,Rf8c8] controlling e5 and intending ...Rc8
and Nh5 or Nfd7. If White plays Bxf6 he will lose control of the black
squares and there is no clear way to attack the king.} 16. Bg3 {[%eval 12,0]
[%csl Rb7,Rc5,Re5] after this White plays to control the black squares e5 and
c5 and against the bad bishop on b7.} Rc8 {[%eval 10,0]} 17. Qe2 {[%eval 13,0]}
Bxg3 {[%eval 13,0]} (17... Nh5 18. Bxd6 Qxd6 19. Ne5 Nf6 {is also possible
with a small edge for White.} (19... Nf4 $2 20. Qf3 Nxd3 21. Qxf7+ $18)) 18.
hxg3 {[%eval 16,0]} Qd6 {[%eval 19,0]} 19. Rc2 {[%eval 19,0]} Nbd7 {[%eval 29,
0]} (19... Rc7 20. Rfc1 Rac8 21. Bxa6 {with a clear pawn up.}) 20. Rfc1 {
[%eval 21,0]} Rab8 {[%eval 41,0]} (20... Rc7 {was possible and natural. White
could play:} 21. a3 {to continue with b4.} ({but not} 21. Nb5 Rxc2 22. Nxd6
Rxc1+ 23. Ne1 (23. Kh2 Ng4+ 24. Kh3 Ndf6) 23... Rb8 {and Black is better.}) (
21. Na4 Rac8 22. Rxc7 Rxc7 23. Rxc7 Qxc7 24. Qc2 Qxc2 25. Bxc2 a5 $1 {is equal.
} (25... Kf8 $2 26. b4))) 21. Na4 {[%eval 27,0]} (21. a3 {was a good
alternative.}) 21... Ne4 {[%eval 55,0]} ({better was} 21... Rxc2 22. Rxc2 (22.
Qxc2 Rc8 23. Qxc8+ Bxc8 24. Rxc8+ Nf8 {is good for Black.}) 22... Bc6 (22...
Ne4) 23. Nc5 Bb5 24. Bxb5 axb5 $14) 22. Rxc8+ $1 {[%eval 50,0] forcing the
bishop to c8 and controlling the c file.} Bxc8 {[%eval 74,0]} 23. Qc2 {[%eval
53,0]} ({Another possibility worth considering was} 23. Bxe4 {but after} dxe4
24. Qxe4 Bb7 25. Qe3 (25. Qf4 $6 {just leads to equality after} Qxf4 26. gxf4
Bxf3 27. gxf3 Rb4) ({The same goes for} 25. Qe2 Bxf3 26. gxf3 Qxd4 {and White
has nothing.}) 25... Bc6 $1 {The key equalizer.} (25... Bxf3 {on the other
hand would be a mistake.} 26. gxf3 Rb4 27. Rc8+ Kh7 28. Rc4 $1 {white is a
clear pawn up. No, the rook is not exactly hanging.} Rxc4 29. Qd3+ {wins it
right back.})) (23. Qe1 {would be interesting with the idea} Bb7 24. Qa5) 23...
g5 $2 {[%eval 70,0] The decisive mistake.} ({The natural} 23... Bb7 {would be
answered by} 24. Nc5 {with a small but clear advantage for White.} Rc8 25. b4)
(23... Ndf6 {was the best defense. White could play Nc5 or Ne5 retaining the
advantage, but not} 24. Qc7 Bd7 $1 {and black is doing fine.}) 24. Qc7 {[%eval
117,0] Now Boris controls the entire board and we can clearly see the problems
the bad bishop is causing.} Qxc7 {[%eval 106,0]} 25. Rxc7 {[%eval 103,0]} f6 {
[%eval 209,0]} 26. Bxe4 {[%eval 124,0] Not wasting his chance, Gelfand plays
all the correct moves until the end.} dxe4 {[%eval 164,0]} 27. Nd2 {[%eval 196,
0]} f5 {[%eval 196,0]} 28. Nc4 {[%eval 217,0]} Nf6 {[%eval 315,0]} 29. Nc5 {
[%eval 199,0]} Nd5 {[%eval 331,0]} 30. Ra7 {[%eval 355,0]} Nb4 {[%eval 236,0]}
31. Ne5 {[%eval 145,0]} Nc2 {[%eval 283,0] '?!'} 32. Nc6 {[%eval 287,0] '+-'}
Rxb2 {[%eval 284,0]} 33. Rc7 {[%eval 312,0]} Rb1+ {[%eval 489,0]} 34. Kh2 {
[%eval 428,0]} e3 {[%eval 1041,0]} 35. Rxc8+ {[%eval 29987,0]} Kh7 {[%eval
1813,0]} 36. Rc7+ {[%eval 1854,0]} Kh8 {[%eval 29988,0]} 37. Ne5 (37. Nd7 {
would be mate in 17 moves according to the computer.}) 37... e2 38. Nxe6 {and
the world champion resigned. Tha last trick was} (38. Ng6+ Kg8 39. Nxe6 $2 Rh1+
40. Kxh1 e1=Q+ 41. Kh2 Qxe6 {and ... Black wins!}) 1-0

descriptionWorld Chess Championship 2012 EmptyRe: World Chess Championship 2012

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