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World Chess Championship 2012

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Game seven commentary by Daniel King

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Game seven commentary by Andrew Martin

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.21"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "*"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[Annotator "Robot 4"]
[PlyCount "18"]
[EventDate "2012.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]
[TimeControl "40/7200+30:20/3600+30:900+30"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. f3 c5 4. d5 d6 5. e4 Bg7 6. Ne2 O-O 7. Nec3 Nh5 8. Bg5
Bf6 9. Bxf6 exf6 *

World Chess Championship 2012 - Page 2 Pos810

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.21"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "E60"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[Annotator "Robot 4"]
[PlyCount "23"]
[EventDate "2012.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]
[TimeControl "40/7200+30:20/3600+30:900+30"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. f3 c5 4. d5 d6 5. e4 Bg7 6. Ne2 O-O 7. Nec3 Nh5 8. Bg5
Bf6 9. Bxf6 exf6 10. Qd2 f5 11. exf5 Bxf5 12. g4 *

World Chess Championship 2012 - Page 2 Pos117

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Anand,V - Gelfand,B, World Chess Championship Match 2012
rn1q1rk1/pp3p1p/3p2p1/2pP1b1n/2P3P1/2N2P2/PP1Q3P/RN2KB1R b KQ g3 0 1

Analysis by Houdini 2.0c Pro x64:

12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 6/21 00:00:00 0kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 7/21 00:00:00 0kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 8/21 00:00:00 0kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 9/21 00:00:00 0kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 10/21 00:00:00 1kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 11/21 00:00:00 1kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 12/21 00:00:00 1kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 13/21 00:00:00 1kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 14/21 00:00:00 1kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 15/29 00:00:00 214kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 16/32 00:00:00 725kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 Nd7 16.Kc2 f5 17.h3 Rae8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Kb1 Qf2 20.Rhf1 Qd4 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rd1
= (0.00) Depth: 17/38 00:00:01 6764kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 f5 16.Kc2 fxg4 17.fxg4 Nd7 18.Qe1 Qf2 19.Qxf2 Rxf2 20.Rbe1 Re8 21.h3 Rg2 22.Rhg1 Rxg1 23.Rxg1 Re3 24.h4 Ne5 25.Rf1 Ne8
= (-0.02) Depth: 18/43 00:00:04 19566kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1 Bxb1 14.Rxb1 Ng7 15.Be2 f5 16.Kc2 fxg4 17.fxg4 Nd7 18.Qe1 Qf2 19.Qxf2 Rxf2 20.Rbe1 Re8 21.h3 Rg2 22.Rhg1 Rf2 23.Rgf1 Rg2 24.Rg1 Rf2
= (0.00) Depth: 19/43 00:00:08 36811kN
12...Qh4+ 13.Kd1
= (0.06 --) Depth: 20/49 00:00:22 106mN
12...Bxb1 13.Rxb1 Ng7 14.Be2 Nd7 15.0-0 f5 16.Rbe1 Qh4 17.Nb5 fxg4 18.fxg4 Qe7 19.b3 a6 20.Nc3 Rae8 21.Qh6 Qe5 22.Qd2 Qe7 23.Qh6
= (0.00) Depth: 20/49 00:00:29 136mN
12...Bxb1 13.Rxb1 Ng7 14.Bd3 Re8+ 15.Be2 Qh4+ 16.Kd1 Nd7 17.Kc2 Rad8 18.Rbe1 a6 19.Ne4 Nf6 20.Nc3 Nd7 21.Ne4
= (0.00) Depth: 21/49 00:01:10 321mN


draw!? smile

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.21"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "E60"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[Annotator "Robot 4"]
[PlyCount "33"]
[EventDate "2012.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]
[TimeControl "40/7200+30:20/3600+30:900+30"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. f3 c5 4. d5 d6 5. e4 Bg7 6. Ne2 O-O 7. Nec3 Nh5 8. Bg5
Bf6 9. Bxf6 exf6 10. Qd2 f5 11. exf5 Bxf5 12. g4 Re8+ 13. Kd1 Bxb1 14. Rxb1 Qf6
15. gxh5 Qxf3+ 16. Kc2 Qxh1 17. Qf2 1-0


rn2r1k1/pp3p1p/3p2p1/2pP3P/2P5/2N5/PPK2Q1P/1R3B1q b - - 0 17

World Chess Championship 2012 - Page 2 Pos118


Short game!!! eek bigsmile cool

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Game 8 analysis by GM Daniel King

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Game 8 analysis by IM Andrew Martin

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[Event "WCh 2012"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "2012.05.23"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E54"]
[WhiteElo "2739"]
[BlackElo "2799"]
[Annotator "IM Malcolm Pein"]
[PlyCount "98"]
[EventDate "2012.05.11"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 {The Slav is evidently in the repair shop} 4. e3
{The Rubinstein, still trendy after all these years particularly now that Ivan
Sokolov has published a new book} O-O 5. Bd3 d5 6. Nf3 c5 7. O-O dxc4 8. Bxc4
cxd4 9. exd4 b6 10. Bg5 Bb7 11. Qe2 Nbd7 12. Rac1 Rc8 13. Bd3 Bxc3 14. bxc3 Qc7
15. c4 Bxf3 $6 {Voluntarily giving up the two bishops. Vishy criticised this
afterwards. "Obviously I messed something up in the opening. Normally speaking
my position is much worse, White just got the two bishops for my two knights
and the only thing I did was to try and provoke this move 19. c5 because I
thought that I would get rid of the bishop in almost all the lines and I could
try and make a fortress. This is in fact what happened in the game."} 16. Qxf3
Rfe8 17. Rfd1 h6 (17... e5 18. Bf5 $16) 18. Bh4 Qd6 19. c5 $5 {Anand was happy
to see this rather than 19.Bg3 he had foreseen the consequences. In the
commentary box Peter Svidler had this on the board well in advance of it's
appearance on the board} (19. a3 $5 {Press conference}) (19. Bg3 Qe7 20. Re1 {
Is nice for White 2Bs v 2Ns is no fun for a nice example of exploitation, if
ultimately White was unsuccessful see Korchnoi-Karpov WCC 1978 Game 5}) (19.
Bg3 Qb4 20. a3 Qa5 {[%csl Gc3,Gd3][%cal Gg3d6,Gd6b4,Gb4c3,Ge6e5] Black can
play for e6-e5 but he must be worse here. Some manouevre like Bg3-d6-b4-c3 is
even possible}) 19... bxc5 20. dxc5 Rxc5 21. Bh7+ Kxh7 22. Rxd6 Rxc1+ 23. Rd1 {
White has won the queen for rook knight and pawn but with a knight coming to
d5 Black has good chances to build a fortress} Rec8 24. h3 Ne5 25. Qe2 $5 Ng6 (
25... Nd5 $5) 26. Bxf6 gxf6 27. Rxc1 Rxc1+ 28. Kh2 Rc7 {As Vishy said he had
many possible setups though in the games it was very tricky to decide
which fortress to choose. And I have pawn on e5, knight on g6 Rook on e7 as
one fortress, pawn on e5, knight on e6, rook on c7 as another, the one I
chose in the game the knight on d5, there are just too many} 29. Qb2 Kg7 30.
a4 Ne7 31. a5 Nd5 32. a6 {This is progress Black has to be constantly on the
alert for Qb7} Kh7 33. Qd4 f5 34. f4 {Now Vishy relaxed somewhat: He said:
"When he played f4 and I had f5 and h5 then I thought I'm safe, I couldn't see
a way forward for him. In fact I don't even need this Re7 and Ng8. I played
this Re7 because I saw this Ng8 trick but if I play Kh6 I think we are just
repeating the position for the second time already. I simply don't know if
white missed a win somewhere."} (34. g4 fxg4 35. hxg4 {[%cal Gf2f4,Gf4f5,Gh2h5]
perhaps offered more chances for kingside play but 34.g4 f4 is also possible})
(34. g4 f4 35. h4 {[%csl Gh4][%cal Gh4h5]}) 34... Rd7 35. Kg3 Kg6 36. Qh8 Nf6
37. Qb8 h5 38. Kh4 Kh6 39. Qb2 (39. g4 hxg4 40. hxg4 Nxg4 41. Qg8 {This
position not so simple, I'm not sure if black is holding or not. - Gelfand.
Now Black can lose with 41...Rc7} Rc7 ({But there is a fast counter attack}
41... Nf2 42. Qc8 Rd3 $1 {[%cal Gd3h3] And White must force perpetual or bale
out} 43. Qxe6+ fxe6 $11) 42. Qd8 Rc6 43. Qg5+ Kh7 44. Qe7 Rxa6 45. Qb7) 39...
Kg6 40. Qc3 Ne4 41. Qc8 Nf6 42. Qb8 Re7 43. g4 hxg4 44. hxg4 fxg4 45. Qe5 {
[%cal Gf4f5]} Ng8 $1 {Preventing f4-f5+} 46. Qg5+ Kh7 47. Qxg4 f6 48. Qg2 Kh8
49. Qe4 Kg7 1/2-1/2

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Game 9 analysis by GM Daniel King

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Game 9 analysis by IM Andrew Martin

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Game 9 - Video report by Vijay Kumar for Doordarshan Indian TV Network

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "2012.05.24"]
[Round "10"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B30"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[Annotator "Romain Edouard"]
[PlyCount "49"]
[EventDate "2012.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]
[TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:900+30"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 {Avoiding the Sicilian Pelikan: not such a surprise
in my opinion!} e6 4. Bxc6 bxc6 5. b3 {[%eval 29,0] A side-move known to be
interesting.} e5 $5 {[%eval 59,0] Almost a novelty! This brillant move simply
solves all problems immediately. Black wants to play ...d6 next with a very
good position, which forces White to take on e5.} (5... d6 6. e5 $1 {is known
to be good for White because of} dxe5 7. Nxe5 Qd4 8. Nc4 $1 Qxa1 9. Nc3 $16) 6.
Nxe5 {[%eval 25,0]} Qe7 {[%eval 25,0]} 7. Bb2 {[%eval 25,0]} d6 {[%eval 13,0]}
8. Nc4 {[%eval 17,0]} d5 $1 {[%eval -1,0] Only a few moves have been played,
and it is already almost clear that the game is going to be a draw.} (8...
Qxe4+ 9. Ne3 {would be wrong for Black due to White's advance in development.})
9. Ne3 {[%eval -7,0]} (9. Ne5 f6 10. Nxc6 (10. Qh5+ $2 g6 11. Nxg6 $2 Qxe4+ $19
) 10... Qxe4+ 11. Kf1 (11. Qe2 $2 Qxe2+ 12. Kxe2 a5 $1 $17) 11... a5 $5 $44 {
The knight on c6 feels a bit alone!}) 9... d4 {[%eval -7,0]} 10. Nc4 {[%eval 0,
0]} Qxe4+ {[%eval 9,0]} 11. Qe2 {[%eval -4,0]} Qxe2+ {[%eval 6,0]} 12. Kxe2 {
[%eval -1,0]} Be6 {[%eval -7,0] Black is just equalizing: the bishop pair
compensates for the doubled c-pawns.} 13. d3 {[%eval -3,0]} Nf6 {[%eval 5,0]}
14. Nbd2 {[%eval 5,0]} O-O-O $5 {[%eval 14,0]} (14... Be7 15. Rhe1 O-O {was
also possible.}) 15. Rhe1 {[%eval 25,0]} Be7 {[%eval 10,0]} 16. Kf1 {[%eval 0,
0]} Rhe8 {[%eval 12,0]} 17. Ba3 {[%eval 0,0]} Nd5 $5 {[%eval 13,0]} (17... Kc7
18. Re2 Bf8 19. Rae1 Nd5 {with the idea of} 20. Ne4 Nf4 $1 {was also possible:}
21. Rd2 Bxc4 22. dxc4 Nxg2 23. Kxg2 f5 24. Rde2 Rxe4 25. Rxe4 fxe4 26. Rxe4 Kd7
$11) 18. Ne4 {[%eval 0,0]} Nb4 {[%eval 1,0]} 19. Re2 {[%eval 1,0]} Bxc4 {
[%eval 0,0] Anand was slowly improving his position, so it was time to take a
decision.} 20. bxc4 {[%eval 0,0]} f5 {[%eval 0,0]} 21. Bxb4 {[%eval 13,0]} (21.
Ng3 g6 {is simply fine for Black.}) 21... cxb4 {[%eval 13,0]} 22. Nd2 {[%eval
0,0]} Bd6 {[%eval 5,0]} 23. Rxe8 {[%eval 0,0]} Rxe8 {[%eval 0,0]} 24. Nb3 c5
25. a3 {It is quite impressive how the Israeli player manages to surprise his
opponent in almost every game. Not many people on earth would manage to draw
several games so easily against Anand with Black: Gelfand is not only a
challenger, but also a real candidate for the World Champion title.} (25. a3
bxa3 26. Rxa3 Kb7 $11) 1/2-1/2

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Game 10 analysis by GM Daniel King

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Game 10 analysis by IM Andrew Martin

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Game 10 - Video report by Vijay Kumar for Doordarshan Indian TV Network

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.05.26"]
[Round "11"]
[White "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E54"]
[WhiteElo "2727"]
[BlackElo "2791"]
[Annotator "Gilberto Milos"]
[PlyCount "48"]
[EventDate "2011.10.25"]

{At this point we have a match of two games and taking risks is more difficult.
Let's see how Anand plays the last game. He is more experienced than Gelfand
in world championship matches and he already beat Karpov in the last game of a
match when he needed. Unfortunately he later lost that match in the rapid game
tiebreaks.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 d5 6. Nf3 c5 7. O-O
dxc4 8. Bxc4 Bd7 {[%cal Rd7c6,Ya2a3,Yb4a5,Ya5c7] Instead of ...b6-Bb7 Black
plays ...Bd7-Bc6. One of the differences is that Black can preserve his bishop
pair after a3, playing ...Ba5 and later ...Bb6 or c7.} 9. a3 Ba5 {[%eval 37,0]}
10. Qe2 {[%eval 28,0]} (10. dxc5 Bxc3 {destroying White's structure.}) 10...
Bc6 {[%eval 31,0]} 11. Rd1 {[%eval 14,0]} Bxc3 {[%eval 16,0] A novelty!
Usually Black plays ...Qe7 or Nbd7 here.} (11... Nbd7 12. d5 exd5 13. Nxd5 Nb6
{was played in Knaak-Yussupov 1991.}) 12. bxc3 {[%eval 16,0]} Nbd7 {[%eval 14,
0]} 13. Bd3 {[%eval 12,0]} Qa5 {[%eval 36,0]} (13... Be4 {[%csl Re4]
controlling e4 was the normal move.}) 14. c4 {[%eval 29,0]} (14. e4 {looks
good, but Black can accept the pawn.} Qxc3 15. Bd2 Qb3 {and the queen escapes.}
) 14... cxd4 {[%eval 24,0]} 15. exd4 {[%eval 25,0] This is the second Nimzo of
the match and in both games Anand has chosen the same pawn structure with the
same pieces remaining.} Qh5 {[%eval 64,0] This is the complementary idea
behind Qa5. Now Black exchange queens or can take on f3 weakening White's pawn
structure.} 16. Bf4 {[%eval 38,0]} (16. Ng5 Qxe2 17. Bxe2 {is about equal.}) (
16. Ne5 $2 Qxe2 17. Bxe2 Nxe5 18. dxe5 Nd7 {is better for Black.}) 16... Rac8 {
[%eval 37,0]} (16... Bxf3 17. gxf3 {is possible, riskier, and more difficult
to evaluate. White's structure is a disaster but two bishops are better than
knights with a dynamic pawn structure. For the public this continuation would
have been much more interesting but no one wants to chance losing at this
point of the match.}) 17. Ne5 {[%eval 22,0]} Qxe2 {[%eval 25,0]} 18. Bxe2 {
[%eval 21,0]} Nxe5 {[%eval 32,0]} 19. Bxe5 {[%eval 22,0]} Rfd8 {[%eval 40,0]
Now the position is very balanced and a draw is clear.} 20. a4 {[%eval 16,0]}
Ne4 {[%eval 9,0]} 21. Rd3 {[%eval 2,0]} f6 {[%eval 0,0]} 22. Bf4 {[%eval 4,0]}
Be8 {[%eval 5,0]} 23. Rb3 {[%eval 0,0]} Rxd4 24. Be3 Rd7 1/2-1/2

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11th Game, draw in 24 moves

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Game 11 - Video report by Vijay Kumar for Doordarshan Indian TV Network

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[Event "World Chess Championship Match"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.05.28"]
[Round "12"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B30"]
[WhiteElo "2791"]
[BlackElo "2727"]
[Annotator "Gilberto Milos"]
[PlyCount "43"]
[EventDate "2011.10.25"]

{A decisive game for the world championship title finishing in a draw in 22
moves is really sad. It is clear that none of the players are inspired and I
don't see a favorite in the rapid games.} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 e6 4. Bxc6
bxc6 5. d3 Ne7 6. b3 {[%eval 2,0]} d6 {[%eval 4,0] A novelty. This allows the
weakening of both the e5 and c5 pawns. Normal is} (6... Ng6 7. Bb2 f6 8. e5 Be7
9. O-O O-O 10. Nbd2 fxe5 11. Nxe5 Nxe5 12. Bxe5 d6 13. Bg3 e5 {As in
Spassky-Gulko (1990).}) 7. e5 {[%eval -23,0]} Ng6 {[%eval 20,0]} ({against the
normal} 7... d5 {White would play something like} 8. Ba3 Ng6 9. O-O Be7 10. c4
(10. Nc3) 10... O-O 11. Nc3 {[%csl Rc5][%cal Rc3a4] and Na4 to pressure c5.}) (
7... dxe5 {is also playable and would be similar to the game.}) 8. h4 {[%eval
12,0][%csl Rg5][%cal Rg6e5,Rh7h5] forcing Black to capture on e5 or play ..h5
weakening g5. This move has to be played before White plays Bb2, because on c1
the bishop controls f4 where the black knight might try to flee to.} Nxe5 {
[%eval 0,0]} 9. Nxe5 {[%eval 12,0]} dxe5 {[%eval 8,0]} 10. Nd2 {[%eval 9,0]} c4
{[%eval 28,0] This was not necessary, and was a voluntary decision by Gelfand.
The idea is to open the game for the bishops, an idea that Anand approved of
in the post-game conference.} 11. Nxc4 {[%eval 44,0]} Ba6 {[%eval 23,0]} 12.
Qf3 {[%eval 55,0]} (12. Bb2 f6 {and the white bishop is blocked.}) (12. Nxe5 $4
Qa5+) (12. h5 {is the computer suggestion but I can't see exactly what the
idea would be.}) 12... Qd5 {[%eval 32,0] Giving another pawn and definitively
improving his pawn structure.} 13. Qxd5 {[%eval 10,0]} cxd5 {[%eval 35,0]} 14.
Nxe5 {[%eval 34,0]} f6 {[%eval 22,0] Now black has center and two bishops for
the pawn. It is enough compensation.} 15. Nf3 {[%eval 22,0]} e5 {[%eval 17,0]
In the English commentary, Vladimir Kramnik, upon seeing this position, said
that given a choice, he would actually prefer to play black here. His bishop
pair, powerful center, and possibility to attack weaknesses not only gives him
full compensation, but is actually potentially dangerous for White. It would
be very appropriate to start searching for a draw here, and Gelfand would even
be well advised to decline it should it be offered. In contrast, Peter Svidler,
in the Russian commentary, opined that White was slightly better here.} 16. O-O
{[%eval 21,0]} Kf7 {[%eval 16,0]} 17. c4 {[%eval 20,0] This pawn would be
attacked and c4 is the safest choice.} Be7 {[%eval 14,0]} 18. Be3 {[%eval 14,0]
} Bb7 {[%eval 28,0] Black might have played d4 but Boris prefers to wait for
the right moment. In fact this was his last chance.} (18... d4 19. Bd2 Bb7 {
leads to an interesting position.} 20. b4 {would be an option for White.}) 19.
cxd5 {[%eval 11,0] Good decision! Instead of waiting Anand decides to do
something. He will promote exchanges and try to make his material advantage
count.} Bxd5 {[%eval 33,0]} 20. Rfc1 {[%eval 15,0]} a5 {[%eval 0,0]} (20...
Rhc8 {seemed better, avoiding White's idea.}) 21. Bc5 $1 {White has a clear
but small advantage.} Rhd8 22. Bxe7 {and they agreed a draw. Really
disappointing!} 1/2-1/2


[Event "WCh 2012"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "2012.05.28"]
[Round "12"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2799"]
[BlackElo "2739"]
[EventDate "2012.05.11"]
[Annotator "IM Malcolm Pein"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 e6 4. Bxc6 bxc6 5. d3 {Game 10 was 5.b3 e5! which
was a great novelty and gave Boris an easy draw} Ne7 6. b3 {Novelty Vishy puts
Boris on his own for a change} d6 {Black intends e5 with a strong centre,
White's next is logical} 7. e5 {Now Vishy can pursue the dark square strategy
he intended in G10} Ng6 8. h4 {What a bold move for a game where there is a
world title and half a million at stake} Nxe5 9. Nxe5 dxe5 10. Nd2 {e5 and c5
ar weak. Boris had a long think to 59 minutes used and came up with a dynamic
and bold solution} c4 {Boris thought to 59 minutes!} (10... Qd4 {Would
instinctively be avoided by Boris as Vishy likely to have analysed
complication with the computer} 11. Rb1 Be7 12. Nc4 f6 13. Bb2 Qd5 14. Qh5+ g6
15. Qg4 O-O (15... Kf7) 16. h5 g5 $13) 11. Nxc4 Ba6 (11... Bb4+ 12. Bd2 Bxd2+
13. Qxd2 f6 14. Qb4 Qe7 15. a3 c5) (11... Bb4+ 12. Kf1 $5) (11... Bb4+ 12. Bd2
Bxd2+ 13. Qxd2 f6 14. Qb4 Qe7 15. Qd6 Qxd6 16. Nxd6+ {Looks like an edge}) 12.
Qf3 Qd5 $1 {Boris wants the endgame with 2 bishops and space and gives up a
second pawn} (12... Qc7 13. O-O Be7 14. Nxe5 $1) (12... Qc7 13. Bb2 Bxc4 14.
dxc4 Bb4+ $11) 13. Qxd5 (13. Qg3 Bxc4 14. bxc4 Qa5+ 15. Bd2 Bb4 $1 $11) 13...
cxd5 14. Nxe5 f6 15. Nf3 e5 16. O-O Kf7 {Black has ample compensation. Look
how he has opened the game for the bishops and the light squared one is the
key. To gain some space Vishy must consider c2-c4} 17. c4 Be7 18. Be3 Bb7 19. cxd5 Bxd5 20.
Rfc1 a5 21. Bc5 Rhd8 22. Bxe7 {More notes to follow} 1/2-1/2

descriptionWorld Chess Championship 2012 - Page 2 EmptyRe: World Chess Championship 2012

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WCh Tiebreak: Anand draws final game, retains title!
http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=8195

descriptionWorld Chess Championship 2012 - Page 2 EmptyRe: World Chess Championship 2012

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