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descriptionIntel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe. EmptyIntel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe.

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The Intel Core i7 4930K is a hexa-core processor of the Ivy Bridge E series accompanied by 130 W thermal design power limits, sporting an impressive base speed of 3.4GHz, per core, while able to go up to 3.9GHz with Turbo Boost. The 4930K also offers 12MB of L3 cache and supports a quad-channel DDR3-1866. A rather convenient aspect of this processor is its backwards compatibility with older models of motherboards that used older Ivy Bridge E processors. The 4930K is the model that excited about last generation-i7-3930K and is best suited for multi-threaded workloads that respond well to its six cores.

The charts below demonstrate the difference between Intel Core i7-4930K and Intel Core i7-3930K most important characteristics. These features, together with an IPC (instructions per cycle) number, determine how well a CPU performs. The "Number of cores / threads" graph displays the number of cores (darker area). Lighter area on the graph corresponds to the number of additional threads, provided by Hyper-Threading technology. The "Operating frequency" chart uses dark colour to represent base frequency, while lighter area is for extra frequency, provided by Turbo feature. Darker area on the "On-chip cache" graph is for the On-chip L2 cache. Lighter area is for the L3 cache.

Intel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe. Capture21

Intel i7-4930k has a higher base clock rate than the 3930k as well as higher turbo frequency, moreover, the clock multiplier in the 4930k is 34 unlike the 3930k which is 32. Intel i7-4930k supports higher Memory data which goes up to DDR3-1866 unlike the Intel i7-3930k which supports Memory up to DDR3-1600 only.

Intel i7-4930k definitely performs more powerful than the 3930k as well as it runs at a much cooler environment due to the new manufacture process thumb up 

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descriptionIntel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe. EmptyRe: Intel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe.

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It Does Not matter how Powerful the Processor is!...

Computers Still make Noughts & Crosses...Tic-Tac-Toe a Draw! smile 


A.R.B

descriptionIntel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe. EmptyRe: Intel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe.

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SImply inaccurate. It is a typical mistake to judge a cpu performance by it's starting or turbo frequency. You should be overclocking your CPU. Therefore the frequency the CPU comes with is irrelevent, only thing that matters is the frequency you get once you overclock. And Ivy Bridge E doesn't overclock that well. Yes, Ivy Bridge E has higher IPC but that is typically just enough to break even with a small lead.

On top of that, Sandy Bridge E supports DDR 1866, it's just not native support. Difference is already small even in applications that use it, Chess doesn't, therefore the entire point is moot. The Ivy Bridge E and Haswell and now Broadwell architectures were not made with top notch performance in mind, but power savings.

It does run cooler and sucks less power... if you don't overclock. Which you should, so that doesn't matter.

I've already talked in depth about this.
https://www.chess2u.com/t4705p45-high-end-cpus-updated

Last page.

Ivy Bridge E has been on the horizon and nobody expected any real improvement since we heard about it. Take it from a computer nerd. Having said that if you don't have Sandy E and you want to get into a Hexa core, then Ivy Bridge E seems like a fine choice But there is no reason for a regular chess player to upgrade from Sandy E to Ivy E. Incidentally the same exact advice is given from other computer enthusiasts for upgrading from Sandy to Ivy, Ivy to Haswell.

descriptionIntel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe. EmptyRe: Intel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe.

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@Eric Lin wrote:
SImply inaccurate. It is a typical mistake to judge a cpu performance by it's starting or turbo frequency. You should be overclocking your CPU. Therefore the frequency the CPU comes with is irrelevent, only thing that matters is the frequency you get once you overclock. And Ivy Bridge E doesn't overclock that well. Yes, Ivy Bridge E has higher IPC but that is typically just enough to break even with a small lead.

On top of that, Sandy Bridge E supports DDR 1866, it's just not native support. Difference is already small even in applications that use it, Chess doesn't, therefore the entire point is moot. The Ivy Bridge E and Haswell and now Broadwell architectures were not made with top notch performance in mind, but power savings.

It does run cooler and sucks less power... if you don't overclock. Which you should, so that doesn't matter.

I've already talked in depth about this.
https://www.chess2u.com/t4705p45-high-end-cpus-updated

Last page.

Ivy Bridge E has been on the horizon and nobody expected any real improvement since we heard about it. Take it from a computer nerd. Having said that if you don't have Sandy E and you want to get into a Hexa core, then Ivy Bridge E doesn't seem too bad. But there is no reason for a regular chess player to upgrade from Sandy E to Ivy E.

Hi! Thanks for the info thumb up 

Overclocking is always an option as long as the risk is on the overclocker's responsibility, therefore many might avoid this trying not to risk the hardware that they probably payed alot for. I think you got it wrong, the comparison was between the 4930k and the 3930k, both at stock situation, not between the Sandy Bridge and the Ivy Bridge. Yes, it is true that the 3930k can approach the 4930k when it comes to overclocking because the Ivy chips gets much hotter than the Sandy ones when overclocked; Sandy E is an overclocking beast.

So concerning stock situation of both 4930k and 3930k, 4930k will definitely lead due to the higher stock frequency, 4x faster PCI speed, and runs at a higher clock! Stock 4930k's CPU temperature is lower as well so I think if a regular chess player is looking for an upgrade and avoids overclocking then 4930k will be a good choice because it almost costs the same as the 3930k however, if a regular overclocker and knows how to do it right, then 3930k would be a better overclocking chip thumb up 

Surely, I am not as experienced as you are in hardwares but I hope I didn't give any misleading info above smile Please, correct me if I did, I would love to learn more!

Thanks!

descriptionIntel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe. EmptyRe: Intel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe.

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Even if you don't overclock, the point remains: The performance gains of Ivy Bridge E is too small to be worth an upgrade from Sandy but if you are going into Hexa core for first time it's definitely an option.

Overclocking is a risk but so is anything in life. When I walk down the street I might get hit by a car. It's already assumed that when you drop $500 or more on a CPU, you've got the money to afford such a high-end CPU, and you care about performance enough for the extra $300 to be justified. I would argue by not overclocking you're losing money already due to the opportunity cost of losing a ton of performance on the fancy CPU you just got. Let's say you get a 20% performance boost via overclocking. If you didn't overclock you basically lost 20% value of the $500 CPU you just got.

A higher stock frequency of like, 100mhz or so won't really matter. If you're concerned enough about that 100mhz then you should be 5 times more concerned with overclocking. x4 faster PCI-E speed is a marketing gimmick, even for people that use it... Unless you have quad SLI (four graphics cards) Titans, that'd be another $4000 lol. And that's not even chess related and therefore won't impact chess performance.

I understand not everybody wants to overclock but the pricier the CPU IMO the more you stand to lose by not overclocking. Also, CPU is basically the hardiest part of the computer. You'd have to do some pretty ridiculous things to break a CPU by overclock.

One option maybe, is to try a small overclock. A light overclock, one you personally feel comfortable with then.

But yes like I said before, if you're getting a new Hexa, Ivy Bridge E, but the performance improvement from Sandy E is not significant enough to warrant an upgrade. Ivy Bridge E still takes the crown as #1 consumer grade workstation CPU, but only by being a bit better than second place. So I wouldn't call it a beast. Maybe it's still a beast though, just because it's better no matter the margin. Most enthusiasts were disappointed but not surprised to read the benchmarks of Iby Bride E, not such a large gain after many years.

Sandy E doesn't just approach a stock Ivy E when overclocked, it tramples it.

descriptionIntel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe. EmptyRe: Intel i7-4930k, New chess beast? Maybe.

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