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descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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http://www.sochi2014.fide.com/

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Game 1 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen




Game 2 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Magnus Carlsen vs Viswanathan Anand

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Game 2

Carlsen, M. 2863–Anand, V. 2792 1–0

[pgn][Event "WCh 2014"]
[Site "Sochi RUS"]
[Date "2014.11.09"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Carlsen, M."]
[Black "Anand, V."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C65"]
[WhiteElo "2863"]
[BlackElo "2792"]
[PlyCount "69"]
[EventDate "2014.11.08"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 {The Berlin! Betting money that it would be seen this match would have had sure dividends; pretty much everyone expected this opening to be seen at some point in the match. Carlsen chooses not to go into the Berlin endgame and instead chooses one of the "quieter" d3 systems.} Bc5 {This is the "point" of Black's play. Usually he has to commit to playing the bishop to e7 and only then does White go d3, a variation that is becoming increasingly popular in the Spanish. In this particular move order, the bishop has no reason to fear going to c5.} 5. O-O d6 6. Re1 {White has tried basically everything under the sun, but this peculiar move-order has yet to be employed. Normally they start with the move c3 or Nbd2.} O-O 7. Bxc6 bxc6 {White cannot claim a real advantage. His pawn structure superiority is compensated by Black's solid position and pair of bishops. However it is a completely playable position; if anything Carlsen is making sure that the game is simply "playable" for both sides without trying to milk an advantage from the opening.} 8. h3 Re8 9. Nbd2 Nd7 10. Nc4 Bb6 11. a4 a5 12. Nxb6 cxb6 13. d4 Qc7 {In many cases the presence of opposite colored bishops means that any endgame will be drawn. This is still the case here, but White has a few resources to put some pressure. He does hold more space at the moment.} 14. Ra3 $5 {A creative rook lift. The queenside rook is trying to make its way to the kingside or even the center to put some quick pressure on that flank.} (14. Nh4 {was a serious suggestion, but after} Nf8 {Black seems to be too solid.}) 14... Nf8 (14... exd4 15. Nxd4 Nc5 16. Bf4 $14) 15. dxe5 dxe5 16. Nh4 Rd8 $6 {Had Anand seen what happened to him in the game, he might have refused to play this move altogether. There is no reason to force White's queen to the attack as the d-file holds no value.} (16... f6 {setting up defenses as quickly as possible.} 17. Rg3 Ne6 18. Nf5 g6 19. Qh5 Ng7 $1 {Exchanging the powerful knight. White's attack is not nearly as strong without it.} 20. Nxg7 (20. Nh6+ Kh8 21. Qd1 Ba6 $1 {Just leave sthe knight stranded on h6.}) 20... Qxg7 21. Qh4 Ba6 $11) 17. Qh5 f6 18. Nf5 Be6 $2 {I believe this relatively careless move is the beginning of Black's problems. Vishy underestimates how quickly he has to repeal White's pieces.} (18... Qf7 {also looked like a possible way of repealing some of White's threats.} 19. Qg4 Bxf5 20. exf5 Rd4 21. Qf3 Qd5 $11) 19. Rg3 Ng6 (19... Rd7 $1 {Was still more resilient.} 20. Bh6 g6 21. Qh4 Qd8 $1 {This is st ill slightly unpleasant, but I don't see any immediate threats for White.}) 20. h4 {Lots of pressure is piling up on the kingside! It is not obvious anymore how Black can repeal White's attack.} (20. Bh6 $5 {This interesting move leads to a long, forced variation.} Rd7 (20... gxh6 21. Rxg6+ hxg6 22. Qxg6+ Kf8 23. Qxf6+ Qf7 (23... Bf7 24. f4 $1 {And White's attack will crash through.} (24. Qh8+ Bg8 25. Re3 $18 {is also good enough.})) 24. Qxh6+ Ke8 25. Qh8+ Kd7 26. Rd1+ Kc7 27. Qxe5+ Kb7 28. Nd6+ Rxd6 29. Rxd6 {And White comes out wi th a material advantage, though Black should be able to hold by creating his own threats.} Re8 $1 $14) 21. h4 {-20.h4.}) 20... Bxf5 (20... Rd7 21. Bh6 $1 Bxf5 (21... gxh6 {allows White to recuperate the piece with devastating consequences.} 22. Qxh6 Qd8 23. h5 {and the advantage is clearly in White's court.}) 22. exf5 Nf8 23. Re4 $5 {And White's pressure is nothing to scoff at. It is quickly mounting and hard to repeal.}) 21. exf5 Nf4 22. Bxf4 exf4 23. Rc3 $1 c5 24. Re6 $1 {It is clear that W hite has tremendous pressure. The control over th e-file, the pressure on b6, the anchored rook on e6, and also importantly the complete lack of counterplay. Black is not lost yet but it is very unpleasant.} Rab8 25. Rc4 Qd7 26. Kh2 {Of course White has no interest in allowing Qd1+ with a queen trade.} Rf8 {Passive, but what else to do? There is a lack of a clear plan for Black.} (26... Qd1 $2 27. Re8+ $18) 27. Rce4 Rb7 28. Qe2 b5 $5 {A nice opportunity to get rid of the pawn on b6 and open the b-file, but Black's c and a pawns now become targets.} 29. b3 (29. Re7 $1 Qd6 (29... Qc6 30. Rxb7 Qxb7 31. axb5 {is hopeless.}) 30. f3 Rxe7 31. Rxe7 bxa4 32. Qe4 {Qb7 is a big threat.} Qb8 33. Qxa4 {it is hard to believe Black can survive with absolutely no activity.}) 29... bxa4 30. bxa4 Rb4 31. Re7 Qd6 32. Qf3 $1 {The queen wants to start looking for ways of getting into the seventh rank.} Rxe4 33. Qxe4 f3+ 34. g3 h5 $4 {A horrible blunder in a very difficult position.} (34... Qd2 {The only good way of preventing the queen from coming to b7 is by attacking f2, but this gives up the f3 pawn.} 35. Qxf3 Qxc2 36. Kg2 {and Black's is close to lost, but not there yet.}) 35. Qb7 {As once World Championship contender Nigel Short pointed out on twitter: "Blunders don't happen in a vacuum. 34...h5?? came after enormous sustained pressure.". Carlsen created something out of seemingly nothing and earned a great victory.} 1-0
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descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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s.chess wrote:
Game 2

Carlsen, M. 2863–Anand, V. 2792   1–0

34...h5? sealed the casket for Vishy Anand
20. h4 was a crushing move. Thanks s.chess thumb up

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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anand 1-carlsen0

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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Game 3 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 Captur10




[pgn][Event "WCh 2014"]
[Site "Sochi RUS"]
[Date "2014.11.11"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Anand, V."]
[Black "Carlsen, M."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D37"]
[WhiteElo "2792"]
[BlackElo "2863"]
[PlyCount "67"]
[EventDate "2014.11.08"]
[SourceDate "2014.01.04"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. c5 {This
style of the "Aronian Queen's Gambit" has become popular in recent years. In
the super-tournament going on in Moscow, Tashir, we have seen his position
several times.} c6 (7... Nh5 {has been the favorite of the Black players in
Tashir.}) 8. Bd3 b6 9. b4 a5 10. a3 {White's expansion on the queenside looks
scary, but if Black can look it down, open the a-file successfully and trade
off his light-squared bishop (which is many times simply dead), then he can
hold comfortably. Of course, doing this takes a long time.} Ba6 11. Bxa6 Rxa6
12. b5 $1 {This creation of a passed pawn has been known for some time. All of
this is well-known theory.} cxb5 13. c6 Qc8 14. c7 b4 15. Nb5 a4 16. Rc1 Ne4
17. Ng5 {Taking twice on g5 is certainly impossible, but taking once might be
necessary.} Ndf6 (17... Bxg5 18. Bxg5 Ra5 (18... Nxg5 $4 19. Nd6 $18 {rips
apart the blockade and wins the queen.}) 19. Be7 $5 Re8 (19... Rxb5 20. Bxf8
Kxf8 21. Qxa4 Ra5 22. Qxb4+ {is somewhat unclear. The passed pawn on c7 does
compensate for Black's two knights against a rook.} Ke8 $1 $13) 20. Bxb4 Rxb5
21. Qxa4 $14 {and the rook on b5 is trapped. This must favor White as Black's
rook on e8 is very passive.}) 18. Nxe4 Nxe4 19. f3 Ra5 20. fxe4 {Even though
both players took a long time to get here (about an hour and a half to get to
this position between the both of them) only 20.fxe4! is a novelty.} (20. Qe2
Qd7 21. fxe4 Rc8 $1 $15 {Aronian-Adams, 2013. Vishy must have taken a fresh
look at this game.}) 20... Rxb5 21. Qxa4 Ra5 22. Qc6 bxa3 23. exd5 Rxd5 24.
Qxb6 {A fascinating position. Material is equal, but White's position is
clearly to be preferred. The reason is that the a-pawn is not as dangerous as
the c-pawn, which needs to be blockaded immediately.} Qd7 25. O-O (25. Qa6 {
The computers were screaming for this move to be played in many occassions, but
it was not always that clear.}) 25... Rc8 (25... g5 26. Qb8 $1 Rc8 27. Qxc8+
Qxc8 28. Rb1 $16) 26. Rc6 {Interestingly, this exact position was seen in the
game Tomashevsky, Evgeny - Riazantsev, Alexander from the 2008 Russian Super
Final. Except, in that game, White's pawn was on h3, and not on h2! 
Tomashevsky also won that game rather cleanly.} g5 {Black is running out of
resources. He has to devote too much to stopping the c-pawn and this means
that his a-pawn is not playing.} 27. Bg3 Bb4 28. Ra1 $1 {An excellent move.
There is no way to rip through the blockade immediately, so Anand adds
pressure on the a-pawn.} Ba5 29. Qa6 $1 {Keeping an eye on the a-pawn and
especially the bishop on a5.} Bxc7 30. Qc4 $1 {The pressure on the bishop is
huge. This will cost Carlsen a piece. At this point he was also very low on
the clock.} (30. Rxa3 {was also strong as the bishop is pinned regardless.})
30... e5 31. Bxe5 Rxe5 32. dxe5 {As Svidler pointed out, Black has excellent
chances to draw this game if he can break the pin and put pressure on White's
weak pawns. But that, simply put, is not going to happen!} Qe7 33. e6 $1 {The
easiest. Now Black's king is also a factor. There is no way to dismantle the
pin, Black's position is simply resignable.} Kf8 34. Rc1 {And it is over!
Anand does it! Excellent preparation by the Indian player and absolutely
precise and surgical game to beat Carlsen very cleanly.} 1-0

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descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyGame 4

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Game 4 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Magnus Carlsen vs Viswanathan Anand

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Game 4 :  1/2 - 1/2

[pgn][Event "World Chess Championship 2014"]
[Site "Sochi"]
[Date "2014.11.12"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "B40"]
[WhiteElo "2863"]
[BlackElo "2785"]
[Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez, Alejandro"]
[PlyCount "94"]
[EventDate "2014.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

1. e4 c5 $5 {Already a sharper approach to the game. Carlsen showed excellent understanding in the positional and quiet waters of the Spanish in game two. Anand hits back in his second black game with the Sicilian.} 2. Nf3 e6 {This move indicates that Black will play one of the following, in case of White going 3.d4 (the open Sicilian): 3...cxd4 4.Nxd4 and then: 4...Nc6 which is the Paulsen, 4...a6 with the Kan or 4...Nf6 followed by 5...d6 which is the Scheveningen. Unfortunately we will not know which one Anand had planned until, maybe, the next game Carlsen has white!} 3. g3 {This way of avoiding the theoretical battle has been very popular in the last few years. I go into an in-depth discussion of this variation in my recently released DVD on the Paulsen Sicilian that you can find at the ChessBase Shop.} Nc6 4. Bg2 d5 5. exd5 exd5 6. O-O Nf6 7. d4 Be7 {There are many ways that Black can develop once he plays d5. Some of the more popular ones are as Anand played, but without Nc6, or playing Bd6 and Nge7. This specific variation is a little more rare, but the character of the position should not change.} 8. Be3 (8. Nc3 O-O 9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. a3 $5 {was played in Zvjaginsev-Rublevsky this year. Zvjaginsev is one of the experts on the white side of this variation.}) 8... cxd4 {The first move for which Anand took a small think. It was more or less forced, but he is trying to evaluate how to continue from here. Probably Anand expected 8.Nc3.} 9. Nxd4 Bg4 {Black develops with tempo as it is not trivial to defend the queen. The queen does not want to move, but hardly has a choice.} (9... O-O 10. Nc3 Bg4 11. Qd3 {was Jones-Caruana from the Reykjavik Open from 2012. The move-order difference allows Carlsen to put his knight on d2 rather than on c3, but it does not seem to make a big difference.}) 10. Qd3 (10. f3 {is too ugly to be played, as it locks in the bishop on g2 and weakens the bishop on e3.}) 10... Qd7 11. Nd2 O-O 12. N2f3 Rfe8 13. Rfe1 Bd6 { White has play against the isolated pawn, but in return all of Black's pieces are well placed. He will soon bring his rook to c8 finishing his development comfortably and he has relatively little to worry about in the short-run. He has to keep up some kind of pressure so White doesn't simplify into an endgame where the pawn might be weak.} 14. c3 h6 15. Qf1 $5 {The queen did not feel comfortable on d3 as it was vulnerable to certain knight jumps. He also prepares Bh3 - just in case.} Bh5 16. h3 Bg6 17. Rad1 Rad8 18. Nxc6 bxc6 {With the structure changing to hanging pawns d5 is not nearly as weak, and since the c-file is not open c6 is not a big target. White has to exert pressure on the center quickly or he risks being worse.} 19. c4 Be4 20. Bd4 {A strangely annoying move for Black, and a move that allows White to keep equality.} Nh7 {The knight is ready to jump to g5!} 21. cxd5 Bxd5 (21... cxd5 { looks more natural to me than what Anand played, but there is nothing wrong with Bxd5 either.}) 22. Rxe8+ Rxe8 23. Qd3 Nf8 {Black re-routes the knight. With Anand's passive play the pawn structure will give White an edge, but it is difficult to do much with it. That being said, if anyone can form an initiative out of nothing, it is Carlsen!} 24. Nh4 Be5 25. Bxd5 Qxd5 26. Bxe5 Qxe5 27. b3 {Every trade makes the Black pawn structure more vulnerable.} Ne6 28. Nf3 Qf6 29. Kg2 Rd8 30. Qe2 Rd5 $5 {A little sharp. With the passed pawn on d5 Black will be able to create some counterplay, but a lot of endgames are lost for him because of White's queenside majority which allows him to create an outside passed pawn. A simple pawn endgame, for example, would be lost for Black.} 31. Rxd5 cxd5 32. Ne5 (32. Qe5 $5 {It made a lot of sense to try to trade queens. It is not trivial to calculate the knight endgame, but it doesn't look pleasant.} Qd8 $5 {Might be both more sedate and more reasonable. White retains a very slight edge, but maybe not enough to claim an advantage.} 33. Nd4 $14) 32... Qf5 33. Nd3 Nd4 34. g4 $5 {A great practical decision! Black has three major options, and with the clock ticking this is not always easy. Black can trade queens on e4, trade queens immediately, or retreat.} Qd7 (34... Nxe2 35. gxf5 Nc3 $5 { Because of White's structure Black is probably fine in this position. However, it is still dangerous as White's pawns on the kingside look threatening.} (35... Kf8 $5)) (34... Qe4+ $2 35. Qxe4 dxe4 36. Nc5 $16 {is just bad.}) 35. Qe5 {White gains some space, but Black's pieces are well placed and White's king is now a bit vulnerable, allowing counterplay.} Ne6 {A nice position for the knight. If White ever goes f4-f5 he will be faced with a defenseless king, while if the knight is allowed to stay on e6 it controls many, many key squares.} 36. Kg3 Qb5 37. Nf4 Nxf4 {Not a bad time to trade knights. With White's exposed king the queen endgame will almost inevitably be drawn.} 38. Kxf4 Qb4+ 39. Kf3 d4 $5 {Black sacrifices a pawn, but he hopes the activity of the queen and the passed pawn will give him enough to draw.} 40. Qe8+ Kh7 {With time control reached, Carlsen took a breather to look at his alternatives.} 41. Qxf7 Qd2 $1 {This move is actually forced. Grandmaster Rustam Kasimdzhanov, who is doing live commentary for the www.playchess.com website, mentioned that Anand would find this by process of elimination if nothing else. Rustam has a good feel for Anand's thought process: he was the Indian's second for a long time!} (41... Qc3+ 42. Ke4 d3 43. Qf3 $1 {and White loses his pawn on d3. All he can do is trade it for the one on a2, but he would be simply down one soldier.} Qe1+ 44. Kxd3 Qb1+ 45. Ke3 $16) (41... Qe1 42. Qf5+ Kh8 43. Qd3 {allows an ugly blockade.}) 42. Qf5+ Kh8 (42... Kg8 $2 {is a clear mistake because it allows White's queen to go to e2.} 43. Qd5+ Kh7 44. Qe4+ Kg8 45. Qe2 $1 {And Black has no good way of making progress with the d-pawn, will probably lose it and with it the game.}) 43. h4 {From a practical point of view, Anand is not worried at all that White will win a long endgame, he will be worried however that he gets mated! Carlsen wants to play g5 and g6 which puts real pressure on the stranded king on h8.} Qxa2 44. Qe6 $5 {Carlsen always likes to keep tension in the position. In this case the queen controls many squares, and White is still threatening g5 and g6.} Qd2 {The queen swings to the defense. It is important to note that g5 is covered.} (44... a5 $2 45. g5 a4 (45... hxg5 46. hxg5 a4 47. Qe8+ Kh7 48. bxa4 $18) 46. Qe8+ { is one of the ways that Black gets mated.}) 45. Qe8+ Kh7 46. Qe4+ Kh8 47. Qe8+ Kh7 {A well earned draw from both sides!} *

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descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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Game 5 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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Game 6 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Magnus Carlsen vs Viswanathan Anand

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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Game 7 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Magnus Carlsen vs Viswanathan


descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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[pgn][Event "World Chess Championship 2014"]
[Site "Sochi"]
[Date "2014.11.17"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C67"]
[WhiteElo "2863"]
[BlackElo "2792"]
[Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez,Alejandro"]
[PlyCount "243"]
[EventDate "2014.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O (4. d3 {not avoiding the endgame this time around! We saw this previously in the match.}) 4... Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Ke8 10. Nc3 h5 11. Bf4 Be7 12. Rad1 Be6 13. Ng5 Rh6 14. g3 (14. Rfe1 h4) 14... Bxg5 (14... h4 15. g4) 15. Bxg5 Rg6 16. h4 f6 17. exf6 gxf6 18. Bf4 Nxh4 19. f3 Rd8 20. Kf2 Rxd1 21. Nxd1 Nf5 22. Rh1 Bxa2 23. Rxh5 (23. b3 Bb1 24. Ne3 Nxe3) 23... Be6 24. g4 {The game's novelty, and a late one. The position had been reached three times in past GM games and they all ended in a draw. Carlsen (or, to be more precise, Carlsen's team) must have figured out that 24.g4 allowed him to retain some pressure.} Nd6 {Played after a five minute think, maybe Anand was recalling his preparation, but from the amount of time he was taking on his moves it is possible he was already making them up over the board. Carlsen, on the other hand, looked confident and played every move after a one or two minute think.} 25. Rh7 Nf7 (25... Bf7 {Is a little too passive. White has more than enough compensation after} 26. Ne3 $1 Rg8 (26... Kf8 27. Bxd6+ cxd6 28. Nf5 $14) 27. Bxd6 cxd6 28. Nf5 $16) 26. Ne3 {White's pressure is annoying. He controls the seventh rank which forces Black to keep the h7 rook out of the queenside with his knight on f7, paralyzing it. The c7 pawn is weak and has to be defended from the bishop on f4. The rook on g6 is inactive and the bishop on e6 has no targets now that it has chowed down the a2 pawn. And yet, Anand has good reasons to believe he will be ok.} Kd8 (26... Ke7 27. Bxc7 Rh6 28. Rg7 (28. Rxh6 Nxh6 {looks slightly uncomfortable for Black, but may be defensible.}) 28... Kf8 $1 $17) 27. Nf5 c5 (27... Bxf5 28. gxf5 {leaves the knight on f7 hanging.}) 28. Ng3 {Carlsen played up to this point only taking two minutes per move at the most. After 28.Ng3 Anand tanked for almost half an hour trying to figure out the position!} Ne5 (28... b6 29. Nh5 {Keeps enormous pressure.}) (28... Kd7 29. Nh5 Kc6 30. Bd2 $5 {preparing a fork on f4 also looks uncomfortable.}) (28... c4 29. Ne4 a6 30. Nc5 Bd5 31. Nxb7+ $1 $16) 29. Rh8+ { And now it was Carlsen's turn to think. He thought for about 25 minutes before he decided to go for this check. He also had a very real alternative in taking on e5.} (29. Bxe5 fxe5 30. Ne4 (30. Rh5 Bxg4 (30... Rf6 31. Ke3 Bd5 32. Ne4 Bxe4 33. Kxe4 Rf4+ 34. Ke3 Rb4 35. Rxe5 {and White's passers definitely look more dangerous than Black's.}) 31. fxg4 Rxg4 32. Rxe5 {is again similar to the game.}) 30... Bxg4 (30... Bd5 $6 {any variation that does not involve taking on g4 looks too risky.} 31. Nxc5 Bc6 32. g5 $1 $16) (30... b6 31. Rh5 Bxg4 32. fxg4 Rxg4 33. Rxe5 {is similar to the game.}) 31. fxg4 Rxg4 32. Nxc5 Rc4 33. Ne6+ Kc8 34. c3 {is a much worse version of the sacrifice in the game.}) 29... Rg8 (29... Kd7 30. Ne4 (30. Rh5 $5 {not letting Black take on g4.} Nxf3 $2 31. Rh7+ $18) 30... b6 (30... Kc6 31. Bxe5 fxe5 32. Rh5 $1 $16 {White's pieces dominate and his position will soon force Black to sacrifice on g4.}) 31. Nxf6+ Rxf6 32. Bxe5 $16) 30. Bxe5 fxe5 31. Rh5 Bxg4 $1 {I think this is the best practical decision that Anand could have taken. The endgames in which he was not allowed to sacrifice his bishop already looked dangerous at best.} ( 31... Rf8 32. Ke3 Bd5 33. Ne4 Bxe4 34. Kxe4 Rf4+ 35. Ke3 Rb4 36. Rxe5 Rxb2 37. Rxc5 b6 38. Rc3 {and White should win the pawn race, making Black's position lost.}) 32. fxg4 Rxg4 33. Rxe5 {A fascinating endgame. I had the pleasure of doing live commentary for this game with super-GM Loek Van Wely, and we both had the feeling there should be a way to crack Black's defense, but we never found one! Somehow Black kept finding interesting resources that just barely drew; most of which involved counterplay and trying to trade off the pawns on the queenside, even at the cost of all of Black's remaining pawns. Nepomniachtchi mentioned in the live broadcast that he thought this should be a draw.} b6 (33... Rb4 34. b3 b6 (34... c4 35. Re4) 35. Ne2 a5 36. Nc3 c4 37. Na2 cxb3 38. Nxb4) 34. Ne4 Rh4 35. Ke2 Rh6 36. b3 Kd7 37. Kd2 Kc6 38. Nc3 a6 39. Re4 Rh2+ 40. Kc1 Rh1+ 41. Kb2 Rh6 {You could say we have reached the starting point. The question here is how Carlsen will attempt to make progress. It seems that Black's only weakness is his pawn on c7, and he must target that. A rook trade is fatal for Black, so he must avoid it unless White's king is so far away that the knight and pawn endgame can be calculated to a draw. This logically means that the knight must attack c7, so d5 is a prime candidate, but things are not so easy.} 42. Nd1 Rg6 43. Ne3 Rh6 44. Re7 Rh2 (44... Rf6 $2 {Anand always had to be careful of falling for a fork.} 45. Rxc7+ Kxc7 46. Nd5+ ) 45. Re6+ Kb7 46. Kc3 (46. Nd5 Rd2 {doesn't help White.}) 46... Rh4 47. Kb2 Rh2 48. Nd5 (48. Ng4 Rg2 49. Ne5 {Putting the knight on e5 was an idea we toyed around for a while, but it did not lead anywhere.} Rh2 50. Nd3 Rh5 51. c4 Rh2+ 52. Kc3 Rh5 53. Re3 Rh2 54. Nf4 Rh4 55. Rf3 Rg4 56. Nd5 b5 {and as much as we tried we could not break down Black's position.}) 48... Rd2 49. Nf6 Rf2 50. Kc3 Rf4 51. Ne4 Rh4 52. Nf2 Rh2 53. Rf6 Rh7 54. Nd3 Rh3 55. Kd2 Rh2+ 56. Rf2 Rh4 57. c4 {Finally White commits to c4. This locks down Black's queenside and creates a stronghold for the knight on d5. Anand has two choices, he can continue without moving (by passing with his rook) or he can try to set up a c6 and b5 structure to hold.} Rh3 58. Kc2 Rh7 59. Nb2 Rh5 $1 {This move signifies the start of Anand's commitment to play b5 and c6. This particular structure will leave c5 very weak, which is why the rook is now needed on the fifth rank.} 60. Re2 (60. Na4 b5 61. Nc3 Rh4 62. cxb5 axb5 63. Nxb5 c4) 60... Rg5 61. Nd1 (61. Na4 b5 62. Nc3 c6 63. Ne4 Rh5 64. Nf6 Rf5 65. Re7+ {We had reached this in analysis before Carlsen played 61.Nd1. It is strikingly similar to the line that was played in the game, but with the rook on f5 things change! } Kb6 66. Nd7+ Ka5 (66... Kc7 $1 67. Rh7 Kd6 68. Nb6 Rf2+ {and although we also tried this position for some time, we could not win.}) 67. Ne5 $18 Kb4 68. Nd3+ {and the fact that the knight here controls f2 is of paramount importance. } Ka3 69. Ra7 $18) 61... b5 62. Nc3 c6 63. Ne4 Rh5 64. Nf6 Rg5 (64... Rh4 $5 { Another way of defending.} 65. Re7+ Kb6 66. Re4 Rh2+ 67. Kd3 (67. Kd1 Rh1+) 67... Rh3+ 68. Re3 Rxe3+ $11) (64... Rf5 {was also good.}) 65. Re7+ Kb6 66. Nd7+ Ka5 (66... Kc7 67. Nxc5+ Kd6 68. Ne4+ {does not work here!}) 67. Re4 (67. Ne5 Kb4 $1 68. Nd3+ (68. Nxc6+ Ka3 $11 {White's pieces are so awkward and the king is so exposed to checks on the ranks that it does not seem possible for him to win! What a surprising turn of events.}) 68... Ka3 69. Ra7 Rg2+ $11) 67... Rg2+ 68. Kc1 Rg1+ 69. Kd2 Rg2+ 70. Ke1 bxc4 $1 {Very well calculated by Anand. He realizes that with White's king on e1 this move exactly works and he can draw comfortably.} 71. Rxc4 (71. bxc4 Kb4 {is pretty obviously drawn. Black just needs to push the a-pawn.}) 71... Rg3 72. Nxc5 (72. Rxc5+ Kb4 73. Rxc6 Kxb3 {leads to a knight and pawn endgame that is drawn, and it was basically what happened in the game after a longer process.}) 72... Kb5 73. Rc2 a5 {White's pieces are completley paralyzed. With b3 being the only pawn remaining there is no way to untangle the queenside. The king cannot approach the b3 pawn to defend it and thus it is doomed to fall.} 74. Kf2 (74. Kd1 Rg1+ 75. Kd2 Rg2+ $11) 74... Rh3 75. Rc1 Kb4 76. Ke2 Rc3 77. Nd3+ Kxb3 78. Ra1 Kc4 79. Nf2 {Carlsen goes for a position in which he can hope to win the pawns and then go into a drawn rook and knight endgame, but one in which he can torture Anand. The rest of the game needs no commentary, Anand held comfortably.} Kb5 80. Rb1+ Kc4 81. Ne4 Ra3 82. Nd2+ Kd5 83. Rh1 a4 84. Rh5+ Kd4 85. Rh4+ Kc5 86. Kd1 Kb5 87. Kc2 Rg3 88. Ne4 Rg2+ 89. Kd3 a3 90. Nc3+ Kb6 91. Ra4 a2 92. Nxa2 Rg3+ 93. Kc2 Rg2+ 94. Kb3 Rg3+ 95. Nc3 Rh3 96. Rb4+ Kc7 97. Rg4 Rh7 98. Kc4 Rf7 99. Rg5 Kb6 100. Na4+ Kc7 101. Kc5 Kd7 102. Kb6 Rf1 103. Nc5+ Ke7 104. Kxc6 { With the last pawn captured White has until move 154 to checkmate his opponent. The clock starts ticking.} Rd1 105. Rg6 Kf7 106. Rh6 Rg1 107. Kd5 Rg5+ 108. Kd4 Rg6 109. Rh1 Rg2 110. Ne4 Ra2 111. Rf1+ Ke7 112. Nc3 Rh2 113. Nd5+ Kd6 114. Rf6+ Kd7 115. Nf4 Rh1 116. Rg6 Rd1+ 117. Nd3 Ke7 118. Ra6 Kd7 119. Ke4 Ke7 120. Rc6 Kd7 {Clearly White has made no progress and he calls it a day.} 121. Rc1 Rxc1 122. Nxc1 1/2-1/2

[/pgn]


Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
M. Carlsen2863
½
1
0
½
½
1
½
     
4.0
V. Anand2792
½
0
1
½
½
0
½
     
3.0

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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Game 8 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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[pgn][Event "World Championship 2014"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2014.11.18"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Anand, Vishwananthan"]
[Black "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D37"]
[WhiteElo "2792"]
[BlackElo "2863"]
[Annotator "Sagar Shah"]
[PlyCount "81"]
[EventDate "2014.??.??"]

{After a 122 move game that we witnessed yesterday, the players might have been a tad tired. (Maybe that showed as Magnus almost dozed off to sleep in the middle of the game today!) But for Vishy this was maybe the most important game of the match. With the White pieces he has been successful in putting pressure on Carlsen in the last three games. After the two white's, this was Carlsen's black after almost three days. Team Magnus had done their homework. Carlsen had a stoic face as the game began. Maybe he was determined not to give any chances to the challenger today.} 1. d4 {Anand sticks to what has worked well for him.} Nf6 2. c4 e6 {The third time in the match that Magnus has played the same moves. The amount of flexibility is so huge from this position that you still may not know what variation is he angling for. Is it the QGD, the Bogo Indian, the Queen's Indian, the Benoni, the Blumenfeld?} 3. Nf3 d5 {It's the QGD once again.} 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 {So far all of this had been played in the third game but now Magnus goes for the old Classical line.} c5 {Just to let you know how popular this line has been: more than 3000 games have reached this position. All the big guys of chess have played it. Kasparov has played it with White on six occasions and five times with Black. Karpov on seven occasions with white and 17 (!!) times as Black! and Kramnik 11 games as White and the same number as black. So you can say that this is surely a line played by the World Champions!} 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. a3 Nc6 9. Qc2 {This is all pretty normal. Now the main move in this position is Qa5. But with Magnus you can always expect some rare sideline in a known variation. And he doesn't disappoint.} Re8 $5 {In a position that occurred in nearly 1000 games in the MegaBase 2014, Magnus plays a move that has only been tried 32 times and never by a 2700 player! The idea of the move is very simple. Play e5 and gain space in the center. If White takes on d5 with cxd5, after exd5 the rook will be standing on a very useful half open file.} 10. Bg5 $1 {Whether this is Vishy's preparation or not is unclear but this is definitely one of the best moves in the position not only removing the bishop from the direct threat of e6-e5 but also preparing to put more pressure on d5 with the help of Rd1 or 0-0-0.} Be7 $146 {This is the first new move in the position. Carlsen must have looked at this position with fresh eyes, asking himself: "Why not Be7?" He found nothing wrong with the move and tried it. Previously d5-d4 had been played by the majority of the players. Magnus plays a move that looks pretty passive but there are a few ideas here. Black might want to go Qa5 later in reply to Rd1. As the bishop already retreated there would be no fork with b4. The computer evaluates these positions as +/=. Carlsen boldly goes into these lines and has the faith that he can neutralize White's advantage by playing accurately. On the other hand, White must be careful not to make even a small inaccuracy or the position would just peter out to equality.} ({This is a game from the Indian National Championship of 2013 where the White player played extremely well.} 10... d4 11. O-O-O e5 12. Nd5 Be7 13. Nxe7+ Qxe7 14. exd4 Nxd4 15. Nxd4 exd4 16. Rxd4 Qe5 17. Be3 $14 {1-0 (17) Lalith,B (2569)-Thejkumar,M (2452) Jalgaon IND 2013 Black has some compensation but maybe not enough.}) 11. Rd1 {The pressure on the d5 pawn begins to intensify.} (11. O-O-O $5 {Is another try. It is difficult to account for all of White's possibilities and definitely 0-0-0 looks dangerous for Black. But if your opponent surprised you, you usually do not want to go into the sharpest line.} Qa5 12. Bxf6 Bxf6 13. cxd5 Ne5 (13... Bxc3 14. Qxc3 $14) (13... exd5 14. Nxd5 $14) 14. Nxe5 Bxe5 15. f4 Bxc3 16. Qxc3 Qxc3+ 17. bxc3 exd5 18. Rxd5 $14 { White has pawn weaknesses but a pawn is a pawn.}) 11... Qa5 {A natural developing move that pins the c3 knight.} 12. Bd3 (12. cxd5 Nxd5 $1 13. Bxe7 Ncxe7 $11 {would give White absolutely nothing.}) 12... h6 (12... dxc4 13. Bxc4 h6 {is not just a transposition of moves. because now White has the additional option of going to f4 instead of h4 and that is a more active square} 14. Bf4 $5 e5 15. Bg3 $14) 13. Bh4 (13. Bf4 $2 {Now this is impossible due to} e5 $1 14. Nxe5 (14. Bg3 d4 $19) 14... Nxe5 15. Bxe5 dxc4 $19) 13... dxc4 14. Bxc4 a6 { In such symmetrical tructures all that counts is activity. Vishy has the more active pieces currently because all his pieces are developed. But that wouldn't last for long as Magnus is threatening to play b5 and Bb7 when the position would be close to equal. This is definitely the moment when Vishy must grab his chance.} 15. O-O (15. Ba2 $5 {was very interesting. The point is that White wants to setup the battery on the b1-h7 diagonal before Black can develop his pieces. } b5 16. Bb1 {Castling can wait. Mating the opponent's king is a much more pressing matter.} g6 {This slight weakening of the kingside might be a small victory for White.} (16... Bb7 $2 17. Bxf6 Bxf6 18. Qh7+ Kf8 19. Rd7 $18 {is game over. You could see how Black was not in time to challenge the white rook on the d-file.}) 17. O-O (17. Bxf6 Bxf6 18. h4 {might be a little bit too much as Black can go} b4 $1 19. axb4 Nxb4 20. Qe4 Nd5 $17 {and before White has even started his attack, his position is falling apart.}) 17... Bb7 $14 {White has a small edge but with the rook coming to d8, I wonder how long will it last.} 18. Bxf6 Bxf6 19. Rd7 Qb6 $1 20. Ne4 Be7 21. Nd6 Bxd6 22. Rxd6 Rad8 $11) 15... b5 16. Ba2 {The Bishop is transferred to the long diagonal to create a battery with the queen. Combined with the bishop on h4, the entry into h7 looks quite possible but as Nigel Short rightly points out, the move Re8 has created a nice luft on f8 for the king.} Bb7 17. Bb1 {Bxf6 Bxf6 Qh7 Kf8 Rd7! is a big threat right now but it is extremely easy to parry it.} Rad8 {Black has developed fully now. Positionally there seems to be absolutely no advantage for White now. The only way he can hope for an edge is by means of concrete threats. And that is exacrly what Anand does now.} 18. Bxf6 Bxf6 {The Queen has now a direct visa to enter h7 but what will she do after that. The king is ready to run away to f8-e7. White has not much in this position.} 19. Ne4 {By this point Vishy was down to 50 minutes having used up already more than an hour while Carlsen was still in his preparation with 1 hour and 44 minutes left.} (19. Qh7+ Kf8 20. Ne4 (20. Qh8+ Ke7 $17) 20... Rxd1 21. Rxd1 Rd8 $11) 19... Be7 {Carlsen keeps everything under control. The funny thing is that a discovered attack by the e4 knight will be devastating as now there is a mate on h7 followed by Qh8, but the the bishop on e7 controls almost all the squares of the e4 knight.} 20. Nc5 (20. Ng3 {was suggested by GM R B Ramesh. This could have been tried by Anand but it is quite risky both ways. He has given up his important dark squared bishop in order to launch an attack  - but if it misfires Black lmight get a long-term advantage.} g6 (20... Bf6 $2 21. Nh5 $1 $16 {is a strong attack.}) ( 20... Kf8 $5 {might be an interesting prophylactic option.}) 21. h4 $1 Rxd1 22. Rxd1 {Anand's threat of h4-h5 of course looks very dangerous but Black has this little tricky move now} Rc8 $1 23. h5 $2 (23. Qe2 {looks best but is not in the spirit of the position.}) 23... Nd4 $1 24. Qd3 {This looks pretty scary for Black. But he can wriggle out of it.} Bxf3 25. gxf3 Nxf3+ 26. Kg2 Rd8 $1 ( 26... Nh4+ 27. Kh3 Nf5 $2 (27... Rd8 $1) 28. hxg6 fxg6 29. Nxf5 gxf5 30. Qd7 $18) 27. Qc2 Rxd1 28. Qxd1 Nh4+ 29. Kh3 Qd8 $15 {Black is totally fine.}) 20... Bxc5 21. Qxc5 {The structure of this position is akin to that of a Catalan. White would be very happy if his bishop were on g2 instead of b1. When Sopiko Guramashivili asked Peter Svidler in the commentary room whether this is the right time for Black to end his pre-game preparation, Svidler said maybe not yet. This shows that there are still some dangers lurking for Black if he doesn't play accurately but nothing much to worry for Carlsen fans, it seemed as if he was still in his preparation.} b4 $5 (21... Rxd1 22. Rxd1 Rd8 23. Rxd8+ Qxd8 24. Bc2 Ne7 {would have also equalized without much effort.}) 22. Rc1 (22. Qxa5 Nxa5 23. axb4 Nc4 (23... Nc6 $6 24. Be4 $1 $14) 24. b3 Bxf3 25. Rxd8 (25. gxf3 $2 Nd2 $19) 25... Rxd8 26. bxc4 Be2 27. Rc1 Bxc4 $11 {was the critical line that Carlsen must have worked out at home.}) 22... bxa3 23. bxa3 Qxc5 24. Rxc5 Ne7 {There is not much left in this symmetrical position. The rooks will be exchanged and a draw will be agreed.} 25. Rfc1 (25. Rc7 Bc6 ( 25... Bxf3 26. gxf3 Rd5 $11) 26. Ne5 Rc8 27. Rxc8 Rxc8 28. Nxc6 Rxc6 $11) 25... Rc8 26. Bd3 Rxc5 27. Rxc5 Rc8 28. Rxc8+ Nxc8 {Both players keep playing this position for another few moves. I do not think they had any doubts in their mind that the point would have to be split.} 29. Nd2 Nb6 30. Nb3 Nd7 {of course the knight had to be prevented from coming into c5.} 31. Na5 Bc8 32. Kf1 Kf8 33. Ke1 Ke7 34. Kd2 Kd6 35. Kc3 Ne5 36. Be2 Kc5 37. f4 Nc6 38. Nxc6 Kxc6 39. Kd4 f6 40. e4 Kd6 41. e5+ {A draw was agreed. A very important game for the theory of the QGD. The idea of Re8 and Be7 is freshly baked in Team Magnus's oven and I am sure it will be subjected to many more tests in the future. But apart from that it was a pretty dull day for the viewers as there were absolutely no fireworks. In games 7 and 8 Carlsen was the one who proved to be the better prepared player. A big blow to Anand because it was one phase of the game where he seemed better than Magnus but not anymore. The match seems to be slowly running away from the Challenger's grasp.} 1/2-1/2

[/pgn]

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
M. Carlsen2863
½
1
0
½
½
1
½½    
4.5
V. Anand2792
½
0
1
½
½
0
½½    
3.5

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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Game 9 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Magnus Carlsen vs Viswanathan Anan

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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Game 10 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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Magnus Carlsen Wins World Chess Championship

Score

Game:
Rtg
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Score
M. Carlsen2863
½
1
0
½
½
1
½
½
½
½
1
 
6.5
V. Anand2792
½
0
1
½
½
0
½
½
½
½
0
 
4.5
[pgn][Event "World Chess Championship 2014"]
[Site "Sochi"]
[Date "2014.11.23"]
[Round "11"]
[White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2863"]
[BlackElo "2792"]
[Annotator "Robot 8"]
[PlyCount "89"]
[EventDate "2014.??.??"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Bd7 10. Nc3 h6 11. b3 Kc8 12. Bb2 c5 (12... b6 13. Rad1 Ne7 14. Rfe1 c5 {was eventually a draw in Anand-Nakamura, 2010.}) 13. Rad1 b6 14. Rfe1 {Played after a ten minute think. It's possible that Carlsen was not entirely familiar with this position specifically and already started to figure out how to place his pieces.} (14. Nd5 a5 15. Nd2 Ne7 16. Ne3 { Kokarev-Leko in the Russian team championship earlier this year. The game was drawn without much happening.}) 14... Be6 15. Nd5 g5 $5 {An interesting approach. This move severely weakens f6, but Anand claims that he can live with a knight there. On the other hand, on g5 Black protects f4, essentially cutting off reinforcements to the e5 pawn in the future. Also the pawn majority has been successfully halted.} 16. c4 Kb7 17. Kh2 a5 18. a4 Ne7 19. g4 Ng6 {So far Anand has played a very nice Berlin. His position is good, but of course White's central domination and extra space allow him to be at least equal.} 20. Kg3 Be7 21. Nd2 Rhd8 22. Ne4 Bf8 23. Nef6 b5 $3 {A bomb shell! This incredibly unexpected move comes with beautiful timing. The pawn cannot be taken or White already risks standing worse.} 24. Bc3 {The strongest idea for White is to ignore the pawn, but now Black's position is quite strong.} ( 24. axb5 a4 25. bxa4 Rxa4 {allows Black to attack the weak c4 pawn and gives him control (for now) of the open a-file. Black is already better and it is not clear how White will hold his position together. For example:} 26. Rc1 Nf4 $1 27. Nxf4 $6 gxf4+ 28. Kxf4 Rd2 $1 $17) (24. cxb5 c6 $1 25. bxc6+ Kxc6 {and now it is White's b3 pawn that is a big issue. The knight on d5 is destabilized which means it must retreat, exposing the weakness on b3.} 26. Ne3 Bxb3 $19) 24... bxa4 25. bxa4 Kc6 26. Kf3 Rdb8 $6 {Played after a 22 minute think. This idea of playing Rdb8 is not bad per se, but its follow-up is not nearly as good.} 27. Ke4 Rb4 {Black sacrifices the exchange, obtaining the pair of bishops, a passed pawn, and fixing his structure on the queenside. Overall he has good chances of obtaining compensation, but not for the full exchange unfortunately.} (27... Rb3 28. Rb1 Rab8 29. Rxb3 Rxb3 30. Rc1 {is playable for both sides, though White does have some annoying pressure against a5.}) 28. Bxb4 cxb4 (28... axb4 $1 {If Black wanted to sacrifice the exchange, he absolutely had to back it up with activity. The only way of doing so was activating his rook on a8.}) 29. Nh5 {The main issue for Black is that his position is still very solid, but it does not have an active way of making progress. If White keeps trading, and trading, and trading, eventually the extra exchange will just be an extra exchange.} Kb7 30. f4 gxf4 (30... Bd7 $1 { Was an interesting resource, but White would have an ace up his sleeve.} 31. f5 Bxa4 32. fxg6 fxg6 33. Nhf6 Bc2+ 34. Kd4 Bxd1 35. Rxd1 c6 36. Nd7 $1 {And ignoring the pawn attack no d5 grants White a huge initiative and two monster passed pawns.}) 31. Nhxf4 Nxf4 $6 {This only helps White.} (31... c6 32. Nxg6 fxg6 33. Nf4 Bxc4 34. Nxg6 Bc5 {was rather bad, but better than the game continuation.}) 32. Nxf4 Bxc4 33. Rd7 $1 {The activity of the rook is starting to make itself felt. Black cannot dislodge this intruder.} Ra6 (33... Kc6 34. Rd4 $1 Ba2 35. Rc1+ Kb7 36. Rd7 {only makes things worse. For example:} Rc8 37. Nd5 b3 38. Nc3 $1 b2 39. Nxa2 bxc1=Q 40. Nxc1 {and Black's position is simply falling apart, starting by the f7 pawn.}) 34. Nd5 Rc6 35. Rxf7 Bc5 {The material difference is too big. Anand is clawing for activity, but White's next stroke ends it.} 36. Rxc7+ $1 Rxc7 37. Nxc7 Kc6 (37... b3 38. Nd5 b2 39. e6 {and the powerful pawn on b2 is not going anywhere.}) (37... Kxc7 38. Rc1 { instantly loses.} b3 39. Rxc4 b2 40. Rxc5+ {and Rb5 next, right on time.}) 38. Nb5 $1 Bxb5 39. axb5+ Kxb5 40. e6 b3 41. Kd3 Be7 42. h4 a4 43. g5 hxg5 44. hxg5 a3 45. Kc3 {The last accurate move, and now Black cannot hold his pawns together anymore.} (45. g6 a2 46. g7 $4 b2 $11) 1-0[/pgn]

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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Game 11 - 2014 World Chess Championship - Magnus Carlsen vs Viswanathan Anand

descriptionFIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014 EmptyRe: FIDE World Chess Championship Carlsen-Anand 2014

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